Sensors & Wearables

In this knowledge hub of Medical Design Briefs, get the latest news about the medical sensors market, including wearables, resistors, ingestibles, and lab-on-a-chip technology.

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Latest Briefs & News

Leveraging lab-on-a-chip technology and the cutting-edge genetic editing technique known as CRISPR, researchers have created a highly automated device that can identify the presence of the novel...

A wearable electronic device is really wearable. The stretchy and fully recyclable circuit board is inspired by, and sticks onto, human skin. The device can heal itself,...

A new device inspired by an octopus’s sucker rapidly transfers delicate tissue or electronic sheets to the patient, overcoming a key barrier to clinical...

A new tool could diagnose a stroke based on abnormalities in a patient’s speech ability and facial muscular movements, and with the accuracy of an emergency room physician — all within...

The crow-like Confuciusornis, which lived about 120 million years ago, was one of the first birds to evolve a beak. Unfortunately, early beak evolution lacks sufficient study. Using an imaging...

News: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Sensor Could Bolster Thermal Imaging

Army-funded research developed a microwave radiation sensor with 100,000 times higher sensitivity than currently available commercial sensors. Researchers said better detection of microwave radiation will...

Researchers have printed sensors directly on human skin without the use of heat.
Sleep-tracking sensors, stepper motors, electromechanical actuators, and more.
Researchers have used 3D printing to make electronic fibers, each 100 times thinner than a human hair, to create non-contact, wearable, portable respiratory sensors.
Global Innovations: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Pot of Gold Engineered to Help with Early Disease Detection
University of Queensland researchers have developed biosensors that use nanoengineered porous gold that more effectively detect early signs of disease, improving patient outcomes.
Researchers have 3D printed unique fluid channels at the micron scale that could automate production of diagnostics, sensors, and assays used for a variety of medical tests and other applications.
Sensing patch detects increased biomarkers in bodily fluids.
Researchers have fabricated tiny energy storage devices that can effectively power flexible and wearable skin sensors.
Genetic material is delivered without producing inflammation or toxicity in the body.
A wound-healing patch; a blood-pressure monitor; an implantable wireless pacing system; and a wearable glucose sensor are this year's "Create the Future" nominees.

A stretchable, skin-like device can be attached to a patient’s face and can measure small movements such as a twitch or a smile. Using this approach, patients could communicate a...

A new type of multiplexed test with a low-cost sensor may enable the at-home diagnosis of a COVID infection through rapid analysis of small volumes of saliva or blood,...

Researchers in Brazil have printed a wearable sensor from microbial nanocellulose, a natural polymer.
Drawn-on-skin electronics allows multifunctional sensors and circuits to be drawn on the skin with an ink pen.
A new, lightweight eye mask can unobtrusively capture pulse, eye movement, and sleep signals, for example, when worn in an everyday environment.
See how advanced adhesive compounds provide manufacturers with an effective alternative to mechanical fasteners.
The system looks for chemical indicators found in sweat.
Researchers have developed a handheld, portable ammonia detector that — like glucometers used to measure blood sugar — assesses ammonia levels from a finger or earlobe prick.
The noninvasive technology could support dietary adherence and detect nutritional deficiencies.
See how s flexible printed circuits (FPCs) are replacing microwires.
A wrist-mounted device continuously tracks the entire human hand in 3D.
Machine-to-machine communication, deep learning, XR, and AI are all going to have an extraordinary will require low-latency manufacturing.

Israel’s Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer, the largest hospital in the Middle East, has launched a pilot program for breakthrough rapid COVID-19 detection tests...

Shielding materials, static control, 3D printing software, and more.

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