Get an overview of the global medical robots market. Visit this Medical Design Briefs Robotics and Automation Hub to receive news, expert advice, and essential information – from the history of medical robots to the technologies of tomorrow.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Octopus Arm Inspires Robotic Surgical Tool

A group of researchers from Italy's Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies created a robotic arm that bends, stretches, and squeezes through cluttered environments. Inspired by the eight arms of an octopus, the device allows surgeons to easily access remote, confined regions of the body and, once there,...

News: IoMT
Engineers Reveal Surgical Robot Security Flaws

University of Washington engineers hacked a teleoperated surgical robot to test how easily a malicious attack could hijack remotely controlled operations. Incorporating security measures will be critical to the safe adoption and use of the robotic technology.

News: Medical
X-Ray Technology Makes Tumors Visible

Using a compact synchrotron source, researchers at the Technische Universität München (TUM) have developed a technology that measures X-ray absorption, phase shifts, and radiation scattering. The technology will help doctors and scientists distinguish between healthy tissue and tumors.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
New Transistor Solders Gaps Between Carbon Nanotubes

A University of Illinois research team developed a new method of soldering gaps in atomically small wires. The more flexible transistor technology, carbon nanotube wires, shows promise in replacing silicon devices.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Researchers Improve Magnetic-Field Detector

A Massachusetts Institute of Technology team has developed a new, ultrasensitive magnetic-field detector. The device could lead to miniaturized, battery-powered devices for medical imaging.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Inkjet Technology Prints 'Soft Robot' Circuits

A new potential manufacturing approach from Purdue University researchers harnesses inkjet printing to create devices made of liquid alloys. The resulting stretchable electronics are compatible with soft machines, such as robots that must squeeze through small spaces, or wearable electronics.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Researchers Use Water to Improve Nanowires

Rice University graduate students and researchers have made nanowires between 6 and 16 nanometers wide. The wires are made from a variety of materials, including silicon, silicon dioxide, gold, chromium, tungsten, titanium, titanium dioxide, and aluminum. The development of sub-10-nanometer sizes...

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Non-Invasive Method Detects Cancerous Cells

Using MRI, Johns Hopkins researchers developed a cancer detection method that does not rely on injected contrast dyes. The technique noninvasively finds telltale sugar molecules shed by the outer membranes of cancerous cells.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
New Adhesive Works Underwater

An adhesive technology helps to bond human tissue in wet or moist conditions. The chemistry is based on the environmentally-friendly adhesive qualities of mussels and other shellfish.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Bioplastics Demonstrate Antibacterial Properties

According to a recent study by the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences, bioplastics made from protein sources have shown significant antibacterial properties. The materials could be used in medical applications, such as wound healing dressings, sutures, catheter tubes,...

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Medical System-on-a-Chip Reduces Hardware Failure Rate

The Desyre project couples a reconfigurable substrate with runtime-system software support in such a manner that the medical system-on-a-chip can adapt on demand to various types and densities of faults, system constraints, and application requirements.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Researchers Developing Bionic Heart

Scientists at the Texas Heart Institute are working to create a permanent artificial heart.

News: Medical
Bioengineers Create 'Heart-on-a-Chip'

A “heart-on-a-chip,” built by UC Berkeley bioengineers, houses human heart tissue derived from adult stem cells. The system could one day replace animal models for drug safety screening.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Magnetic Devices Aid Laparoscopic Surgery

Vanderbilt University researchers have created magnetically-driven laparoscopic instruments.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Artificial 'Smart Skin' Detects Subtle Pressures

A Seoul National University professor developed a synthetic technology that reproduces the sense of touching real human skin. The artificial skin senses pressure, temperature, strain, and humidity. The soft material is also embedded with self-heating elements.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Robotic Ankle Keeps an Eye on the Road

Mo Rastgaar, a Michigan Technological University mechanical engineer, and his team have developed a robotic ankle that "sees" where it is going.

Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
NIH Funding Projects to Develop Assistive Robots

New research in robotics to help with stroke rehabilitation, guide wheelchairs, and assist children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are some of the projects now being funded by the National...

Mission Accomplished: Robotics, Automation & Control
3D Endoscope Boosts Safety, Cuts Costs of Surgery

"A lot of things are not easy to solve when you’re trying to break through a new technology right from the get-go,” says Harish Manohara, supervisor of the Nano and Micro Systems Group...

High Speed Interconnects, Scottsdale, AZ, announces custom, fine-wire and fine-pitch diagnostic imaging assemblies for medical device OEMs producing next-generation...

Features: Robotics, Automation & Control
Inside Story: Mike Boivin, Manufacturing Manager - New England Catheter

To get a better idea of the importance of New England Catheter’s capabilities for medical device customers, Medical Design Briefs spoke with Mike Boivin, manufacturing manager at New England Catheter.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Non-Stick Surface Technology Repels Bacteria

Harvard researchers have demonstrated a repellent surface technology that can be used with medical materials to prevent infections caused by biofilms.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Polymer Coating Brushes Off Bacteria

A*STAR Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology researchers have developed a one-step coating that blocks protein growth and kills surface-bound bacteria on silicone medical devices such as catheters.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Plasma Sterilizer Protects Medical Instruments

A Ruhr-University Bochum researcher has developed a plasma sterilizer that is specifically suited for ridding medical instruments of germs efficiently, without damaging the material.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Implantable Resonators Measure Tissue Oxygenation

Researchers from the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center have developed a technique to directly measure oxygen in deep-sited tumors.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Making Heart Surgery Safer for Kids by Using 3D Printing

Surgeons at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles say that three-dimensional printing technology can make surgery safer for children with congenital heart disease, and reduce the duration and number of invasive procedures required. Richard Kim, MD, a cardiac surgeon recently used a 3D printed...

Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
Using Robot Control Theory to Improve Prosthetics

A University of Texas at Dallas professor applied robot control theory to enable powered prosthetics to dynamically respond to the wearer’s environment and help amputees walk. As reported...

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Nanoscale Surface Repels Bacteria

A new type of bacteria-repelling nanoscale surface holds promise for medical applications.

Modern mobile networks are ubiquitous and accessible virtually everywhere, from remote villages in Africa to deep inside warehouses and hospitals. This universal wireless coverage,...

Remote medical care is undergoing a revolution and the future is bright. Thanks to wireless networks and cloud connectivity across a growing...

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