News: Medical
How Mussel Glue Could Aid Healthcare

Mussels hang loosely from piers and rocks, attached by fine filaments known as byssus threads, which allows them to drift a bit to absorb more nutrients. So why aren't they washed away by waves? The secret is that they secrete a protein closely related to collagen, which is a combination of soft, stretchy...

News: Medical
Researchers Generate Invisible Tag for 3D-Printed Objects

The same 3D printing process used to produce an object can simultaneously generate an internal, invisible tag, say scientists at Carnegie Mellon University and Microsoft Research.

The internal tags, which the researchers have dubbed InfraStructs, can be read with an imaging system...

News: Medical
Elastic Electronics Grows Own Wires

A team of engineers at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, found that networks of spherical nanoparticles embedded in elastic materials could make the best stretchy conductors. Flexible electronics have a wide variety of possibilities, they say, from bendable displays and batteries to medical implants that...

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
'Intelligent knife' Determines Cancerous Tissue Within Seconds

Researchers at Imperial College London, say that they have developed an "intelligent knife" that can alert surgeons immediately whether the tissue they are cutting is cancerous or not. The “iKnife” diagnosed tissue samples from 91 patients with 100 percent accuracy, instantly...

News: Medical
Nanoscale Imaging Method Used in Plasmonics

A team of scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland, College Park, have discovered how to make nanoscale measurements of critical properties of plasmonic nanomaterials, specially engineered nanostructures that modify the interaction of...

News: Medical
Optimizing the Lifespan of Replacement Joints

Researchers at the University of Southampton in the UK say that their MXL project, which uses computational modeling to define the mechanics of an artificial joint, will enable surgeons to ensure successful surgery and fit joint replacements with longer, optimized lifespans. Using a complex...

News: Medical
Student Designs New Type of Cast With 3D Printer

A Victoria University of Wellington School of Design student, Jake Evill, in New Zealand, created a 3D printed alternative to the traditional plaster cast for fractured limbs. Called the Cortex Cast, his design is more lightweight, breathable, and hygienic than fiberglass or plaster casts...

News: Medical
Developing a Thought-Controlled Robotic Arm

Dr. Albert Chi, a 2003 graduate of the University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, and a trauma surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, is part of a team of engineers and surgeons developing a Modular Prosthetic Limb—a robotic arm and hand that a person can control using their...

News: Medical
Controlling Fluid Flow Could Shake Up Microfluidics

A team of scientists from UCLA, Iowa State, and Princeton report that they have discovered a new technique of sculpting custom fluid flows by placing tiny pillars in microfluidic channels. By altering the speed of the fluid, and stacking pillars with different width, placements, and...

News: Medical
Speeding Medical Research Via Crowdsourcing

Harnessing the computing power of ordinary citizens around the world could have the potential to accelerate the pace of health care research of all kinds, say a team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. They say that “crowdsourcing,”...

News: Medical
Creating Tiniest Interlinked Puzzle

Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany, have created a three-piece 3D puzzle, with each piece less than 1 mm in size, which, they say, may be put together to make the smallest puzzle in the world. To create it, the researchers used a new process to manufacture the microstructures by...

News: Medical
Old Hearts May Get New Life

Human hearts from the potential donors that had been deemed unsuitable for transplantation could get a second chance to save a life, say a team of researchers at the University of Sunderland in collaboration with Newcastle University, both in the UK. The scientists are working to restart hearts and develop tests to...

News: Medical
July Mid-Month Industry News

Here is the latest batch of news from the medical products community. Please click the link for more.

News: Medical
FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Adverse Effect Reporting Requirements

On July 9, the FDA issued a draft guidance on manufacturers’ responsibility to report adverse effects from their products: “Medical Device Reporting for Manufacturers,” for the purpose of seeking comments. Comments and suggestions should be submitted regarding this draft...

News: Medical
Adding Sense of Touch to ‘Electronic Skin’

A team of scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, say that using tiny gold particles and resin they have discovered how to make a new kind of flexible sensor that could some day be integrated into electronic skin (e-skin). They say that this e-skin, when attached to...

News: Electronics & Computers
Building 3D Structures with Liquid Metal

Scientists at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, developed a 3D printing technology to create free-standing structures made out of liquid metal at room temperature. They discovered that a liquid metal alloy of gallium and indium reacts to the oxygen in the air at room temperature to form a...

News: Medical
Question of the Month: July

June’s Question of the Month focused on regulation of healthcare/lifestyle smartphone apps. Since regulation of some medical apps may be covered by the FDA, we asked if you thought lifestyle apps, such as pedometers and personal health records, should be regulated, and if so, by which agency. Answers were mixed,...

News: Medical
Using Sound to ‘See’

Researchers at the University of Bath, UK, say that a device that can train the brain to turn sounds into images could be used as an affordable and non-invasive alternative treatment for blind and partially-sighted people. The vOICe sensory substitution device uses sounds to build an image in the minds of blind people of...

News: Medical
Mass Producing Custom Nanoparticles

Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, developing a new coating technology, combined with a novel nanoparticle-manufacturing technology developed at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, say that this could offer scientists a way to quickly mass-produce nanoparticles...

News: Medical
Paper-Based Diagnostic Device to Be Developed

The University of Washington, Seattle, has received nearly $10 million from the U.S. Department of Defense to continue a project to build a prototype of their paper-based device that can test for infectious diseases on-demand in areas where diagnostic capabilities are limited. They say that the...

R&D: Mechanical & Fluid Systems

Inspired by the tail of a seahorse, which can be compressed to half its size without damage, scientists at the University of California, San Diego, are attempting to use similar engineering to...

R&D: Imaging

A new design tool that can interpret hand gestures, enables designers at Purdue University, West Lafayette IN, to create and modify three-dimensional shapes using only their hands as a "natural user...

R&D: Medical

A team of students at the Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, Baltimore, MD, had the opportunity to design a new stethoscope to deliver more accurate heart and body sounds...

R&D: Medical

Nearly all lenses, whether natural, like the lens in your eye, or man-made, such as in a camera or microscope, are curved, which limits the amount of light that enters. But, using a spray-on...

R&D: Materials

A slow-motion method of controlling the synthesis of polymers, inspired by trees and Celtic Knot designs, could open up new possibilities in areas including medical devices, drug delivery,...

R&D: Electronics & Computers

Ulsan National Institute of Science & Technology (UNIST), South Korea, has created contact lenses fitted with inorganic light-emitting diode, and tested them on a live rabbit with...

News: Test & Measurement
Video-Based Pulse Algorithm Developed

Scientists at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, have developed a new algorithm that, they say, can accurately measure the heart rates of people shown in ordinary digital video by analyzing the tiny head movements that go along...

Features: Medical

As an increasing number of patients enter the operating room, more and more orthopedic surgeons are becoming orthopedic patients themselves. According to a survey entitled “Occupational Hazards...

Features: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Managing the environmental and regulatory performance of products is an increasingly complicated challenge for medical device manufacturers who face a myriad of requirements from...

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Eric Dietsch on the Benefits of Nitinol Wire

In collaboration with the Fort Wayne Metals Engineering team, Eric Dietsch focuses on supporting customers with material recommendations, product development, and education. Eric is available to help you and your company with any Nitinol-related questions or needs that you may have.

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