August 2016

Look around you. Doesn’t it seem like everyone is sporting a Fitbit® or other wearable technology? The fact is, consumers are quickly embracing devices that help them monitor...

The world today has become increasingly mobile with advances in powerful and portable technologies, such as...

The landscape of the medical device industry is changing, driven by emerging technologies and the influx of smart devices, telemedicine, and new patient care models. This new frontier...

Medical platform development requires a security-focused mindset, making system protection a priority in the earliest stages of system design. Just as features like...

High-tech adhesives are very reliable and issues do not occur often. When used correctly, these adhesives can resolve many design issues while also saving money, time, and effort. However, there are...

Preliminary testing shows that a new device may enable existing breast cancer imagers to provide up to six times better contrast of breast tumors, while maintaining the same or better image quality and...

Researchers have developed an integrated, wearable system that monitors a user’s environment, heart rate, and other physical attributes to help predict and prevent asthma attacks. The system, called...

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and UL (Underwriters Laboratories) announced a signed Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) program to create medical device...

Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
Electric Mesh Helps Heart Beat

A research team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Seoul National University has developed a new electric mesh device that can be wrapped around the heart to deliver...

The fast-growing Internet of Things (IoT) consists of millions of sensing devices in buildings, vehicles, and elsewhere that deliver reams of data online. However, this wide-ranging resource involves so...

A team of engineers at the Texas Analog Center of Excellence (TxACE) at UT Dallas is working to develop an affordable electronic nose that can be used in breath analysis for a wide range of...

Being able to manipulate virtual fingers, or even fingers attached to a functioning prosthetic device, is not the same as feeling like the device is part of your own body. Researchers at Arizona...

Global Innovations: Medical
Making Robot Caregivers Safer
University of Twente Enschede, The Netherlands www.utwente.nl/en/news

According to a study conducted at the Robotics and Mechatronics department at the University of Twente in The Netherlands, robots carry...

R&D: Medical
Knee Monitor 'Listens' for Cracks, Pops

A knee band from the Georgia Institute of Technology uses microphones and vibration sensors to listen to and measure the sounds inside the joint. The sounds will help doctors determine whether a convalescing joint is healthy or requires more therapy.

R&D: Medical
Wearable Patch Monitors Biochemical, Electrical Signals

For athletes looking to track their workouts or physicians who want to monitor a patient's heart disease, a flexible Chem-Phys patch from the University of California San Diego analyzes the body's biochemical and electric signals. The Chem-Phys wearable technology records electrocardiogram...

R&D: Medical
Students Design Prosthetic Fit for High Heels

A team of Johns Hopkins University students, working with a Johns Hopkins physician and outside experts, has designed a prosthetic fit for high heels. The "Prominence" foot adapts to popular fashion for heels up to four inches high.

R&D: Robotics, Automation & Control
Researchers Develop Ivy-Inspired Medical Adhesive

English ivy has the ability to latch on so tight to trees and buildings that the plant can withstand the winds of hurricanes and tornadoes. Researchers from The Ohio State University pinpointed the spherical particles within English ivy’s adhesive and identified the primary protein within...

R&D: Medical
Metalens Works Within Visible Spectrum

Curved lenses, like those in cameras or telescopes, are stacked in order to reduce distortions and resolve a clear image. A new fabrication method from Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) replaces the stacks with a single flat lens.

R&D: Medical
Super-Fast, Stretchy Circuits Advance Wearable Health Monitors

A team of University of Wisconsin—Madison engineers has created the world’s fastest stretchable, wearable integrated circuits.

INSIDER: Robotics, Automation & Control
Remote-Controlled Microrobots Change Shape

Miniature robots are designed to enter the human body, where they can deliver drugs at specific locations or perform precise operations like clearing clogged-up arteries. A simple and versatile...

MIT researchers developed an adhesive patch that can stick to a colorectal cancer tumor site, either before or after surgery, to deliver a triple-combination of drug,...

INSIDER: Green Design & Manufacturing
Process Could Make Biodegradable Polymer Stronger

Polylactic acid, or PLA, is a biodegradable polymer commonly used to make medical implants and drug delivery systems. Brown University researchers have shown that by treating PLA at...

MIT engineers developed a microfluidic device that replicates the neuromuscular junction — the vital connection where nerve meets muscle. The device, about the size of a U.S....

A neurosurgeon at Mount Sinai Health System is the first to use CaptiView – a microscope image injection system from Leica Microsystems that overlays critical virtual reality imaging...

Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Lab have created a material that is highly breathable, yet protective from biological agents. This material is...

INSIDER: RF & Microwave Electronics
New MRI Technology Eliminates Longtime Limits

A new technology harnesses imperfections that typically compromise MRI exams to create images resolved enough to enable consistent diagnoses across populations for the first time. Traditional MRI radio waves “light up” some parts of a sample better than others, with imperfections blacking out...

News: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Underground Radar Sheds Light on Post-Katrina Damage

An innovative underground radar technology developed at Louisiana Tech University is helping the City of Slidell in south Louisiana to identify and document underground infrastructure damage that had gone undetected in the months and years following Hurricane Katrina.

Ask the Expert

Eric Dietsch on the Benefits of Nitinol Wire

In collaboration with the Fort Wayne Metals Engineering team, Eric Dietsch focuses on supporting customers with material recommendations, product development, and education. Eric is available to help you and your company with any Nitinol-related questions or needs that you may have.

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