February 2010

News: Medical
Intracellular Transport

Using new technology developed in his University of Oregon lab, chemist Andrew H. Marcus and his doctoral student, Eric N. Senning, have captured what they describe as well-orchestrated, actin-driven, mitochondrial movement within a single cell. That movement appears to be coordinated by mitochondria's recruitment of...

News: Medical
Quantifying Therapeutic Efficacy in 2D Microvascular Images

NASA's John H. Glenn Research Center has developed VESGEN, a newly automated, user interactive program that maps and quantifies the effects of vascular therapeutics and regulators on microvascular form and function. VESGEN analyzes two-dimensional, black and white vascular images by...

News: Medical
Magnetometer Detects Heart Conditions With Speed and Precision

University of Leeds scientists have developed a portable magnetometer that offers a new level of sensitivity to magnetic fluctuations useful for early detection of a number of conditions, including heart problems in fetuses.

News: Materials
Self-Healing Hydrogel Offers Applications in Tissue Growth

Researchers at the University of Tokyo have created a hydrogel that is more than 50 times stronger than comparable squishy self-healing materials. The hydrogel is made up of 95 percent water, making it suitable for applications in the body; it could someday serve as scaffolding for new...

News: Medical
Artificial Foot Recycles Energy for Easier Walking

University of Michigan engineers have developed an artificial foot that recycles energy otherwise wasted in between steps, which could make it easier for amputees to walk. A typical prosthesis doesn't reproduce the force a living ankle exerts to push off of the ground. As a result, test subjects...

News: Photonics/Optics
"Nanobubbles" Locate and Kill Cancer Cells

Using lasers and nanoparticles, Rice University scientists have discovered a new technique for singling out individual diseased cells and destroying them with tiny explosions. The scientists used lasers to make "nanobubbles" by zapping gold nanoparticles inside cells. "Single- cell targeting is one of...

News: Materials
New Material Mimics Bone To Create Better Biomedical Implants

A "metal foam" developed by North Carolina State University researchers could mean a new generation of biomedical implants that would avoid bone rejection that often results from more rigid implant materials, such as titanium. The metal foam is lighter than solid aluminum and can be...

News: Manufacturing & Prototyping
3-D Structure of Virus With Potential to Fight HIV Revealed

Vesicular stomatitis virus, or VSV, has long been a model system for studying and understanding the life cycle of negative-strand RNA viruses. Research has shown that VSV has the potential to be genetically modified to serve as an anti-cancer agent - exercising high selectivity in...

Ask the Expert

Eric Dietsch on the Benefits of Nitinol Wire

In collaboration with the Fort Wayne Metals Engineering team, Eric Dietsch focuses on supporting customers with material recommendations, product development, and education. Eric is available to help you and your company with any Nitinol-related questions or needs that you may have.

Inside Story

Videos