News : Robotics, Automation & Control
Micro-Tentacles Help Robots Handle Delicate Objects

Engineers from Iowa State University developed micro-tentacles that enable robots to handle delicate objects.

“Most robots use two fingers. To pick things up, they have to squeeze,” said Jaeyoun (Jay) Kim, an Iowa State University associate professor of electrical and computer...

News : Medical
Study: DINCH Plasticizer Disrupts Metabolic Processes

A new study from Montreal's Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) found that a commonly used plasticizer known as DINCH exerts biological effects on the metabolic processes of mammals. DINCH is found in products that come into close contact with humans, such as...

News : Medical
Researchers Print Three-Dimensional Cellulose Objects

Using a 3D bioprinter, a group of engineers at Chalmers University of Technology have created objects made entirely by cellulose. The additive manufacturing process could be used to build patient-specific implants, new sensors, and wound dressings that communicate with healthcare...

News : Robotics, Automation & Control
Bioengineers Develop Printable Silk Inks

To provide a better tool for therapeutics, regenerative medicine, and biosensing, Tufts University bioengineers have created inkjet-printable silks containing enzymes, antibiotics, antibodies, nanoparticles, and growth factors. The purified silk protein, or fibroin, offers intrinsic strength and...

News : Robotics, Automation & Control
Gecko-Inspired Gripper Supports Tunable Adhesion

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have developed a gecko-inspired gripper. Like the gecko, the device has the ability to grip and release smooth surfaces like glass. The effective stickiness can also be tuned from strong to week.

News : Medical
Engineers Build Nano-Accordion Conductors

Engineers from North Carolina State University have created stretchable, transparent conductors with a "nano-accordion" design. The conductors could be employed in a wide variety of applications, such as flexible electronics, stretchable displays, or wearable sensors.

News : Medical
Nanotubes Provide Better Understanding of Disease

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati Department of Cancer Biology and material scientists from the University of Houston are using nanotubes to examine the regulation of proteins involved in the initiation of cancer and cardiovascular, neurological, and endocrine diseases. The team is...

Features : Electronics & Computers
Researchers Develop Biodegradable Wooden Computer Chips

Portable electronics — typically made of non-renewable, non-biodegradable and potentially toxic materials — are discarded at an alarming rate in consumers' pursuit of the next best electronic gadget. In an effort to alleviate the environmental burden of electronic devices, a team of...

Features : Electronics & Computers
Improving Organic Transistors that Drive Flexible Electronics

A revolution is coming in flexible electronic technologies as cheaper, more flexible, organic transistors come on the scene to replace expensive, rigid, silicone-based semiconductors. But materials scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst say not enough is known about how...

Features : Electronics & Computers
Computing at the Speed of Light

University of Utah engineers have taken a step forward in creating the next generation of computers and mobile devices capable of speeds millions of times faster than current machines. The Utah engineers have developed an ultracompact beamsplitter — the smallest on record — for dividing light waves into two...

News : Medical
New Foam Could Improve Prosthetic Comfort

Changchun "Chad" Zeng from Florida State University's High Performance Materials Institute (HPMI) has developed a new auxetic foam. Prosthetic socks made from the foam will help amputees adjust prosthetic devices to their specific limb shape and volume.

News : Robotics, Automation & Control
Engineers Control Soft Material's Surface Textures

Using a 3D printer and detailed computer simulations, researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology produced soft material with controllable surface textures that can be varied by squeezing. By creating smooth, ridged, or custom-patterned surfaces at will, the technique will allow...

News : Materials
Heart-Powered Electronics

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created thin, flexible electronic devices that efficiently harvest the mechanical energy from natural motions of the human body. In addition to advances in materials processing to enable fabrication of these thin film devices, accurate analytical models...

News : Medical
June 2015 Mid-Month Industry News

Here is the latest batch of news from the medical products community. Please click the link for more.

News : Electronics & Computers
3D Printing with Copper and Gold Achieved

A team of scientists from the University of Twente in The Netherlands has discovered a way to 3D print structures of copper and gold, by stacking microscopically small metal droplets. These droplets are made by melting a thin metal film using a pulsed laser. They say that this technology would allow...

News : Medical
Soft Robotic Glove Improves Patients' Grasping Ability

A robotic glove built by a team of engineers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) could assist patients suffering from loss of hand motor control.

News : Medical
Hydrogel Accelerates Healing Process

An injectable hydrogel from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science helps skin wounds heal more quickly. An instant scaffold created by the material allows new tissue to latch on and grow within the cavities formed between linked spheres of gel.

News : Medical
Microendoscope Offers Alternative to Costly Biopsies

A low-cost, portable, battery-powered microendoscope developed by Rice University bioengineers increases the sensitivity of esophageal cancer screenings. The new technology could eliminate unnecessary biopsies for patients with benign lesions.

News : Medical
Device Captures Circulating Tumor Cells

A microfluidic device called the Cluster-Chip, developed by a team of scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital, is the first designed specifically to capture clusters of two or more rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs), rather than single cells. The ability to isolate intact clusters, they say, can...

News : Medical
3D Bioprinting to Attempt Nerve Cell Regeneration

Researchers at Michigan Technological University, Houghton, recently acquired a 3D bioprinter with which they plan to “print” synthesized nerve tissue. The key, they say, is developing the right “bioink” or printable tissue. One of the team member’s research on cellulose nanocrystals as...

News : Medical
Engineers Put New Spin on Spider Silk

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have produced samples of strong, resilient spider silk. The spun samples could lead to a variety of biomedical materials, including sutures and scaffolding for organ replacements.

Features : Medical
Six Words that Can Kill Innovation

While the late great comedian George Carlin had his infamous “Seven Words”, only six words are needed to kill innovation in any industry: “We’ve always done it this way.” How much more might be accomplished if those six words could be replaced with “what if”? What if we tried it this way? What if...

Features : Materials
How High-Performance Polymers Help Medical Device Designers Work Smarter and Sleep Better

Hospital acquired infections (HAIs) represent one of the key challenges facing today’s healthcare industry. According to a recent study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Network, total costs associated with HAIs reached...

Features : Medical
Pre-Treatment Process Solves Adhesion Issue

Prior to 2006, commercially available aqueous-based polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coatings utilized perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) as a principal surfactant. PFOA was a highly efficient additive and allowed PTFE applicators to coat a wide variety of substrates.

Features : Tubing & Extrusion
Material Selection in a Complex Regulatory Environment

Understanding material selection trends and complying with the needs of governing regulatory agencies is fundamental to success in medical device production. As manufacturers set development objectives, they consider material characteristics, such as ease of processing, performance, and...

Features : Manufacturing & Prototyping
Considering Manufacturability in Early Phase Product Development: Successful Scalability for Medical Device Innovation
Considering Manufacturability in Early Phase Product Development: Successful Scalability for Medical Device Innovation

An experienced, recommended, custom furniture professional came over to my house to bid on building a low-profile cabinet...

Considering Manufacturability in Early Phase Product Development: Successful Scalability for Medical Device Innovation
Products : Medical
Metal and Ceramic Injection Molding

Smith Metal Products, Center City, MN, produces parts as small as .060" OD, IDs as small as .010", and a minimum wall thickness of .010" for a limited distance. Part lengths up to 3" by .25" inches thick, parts over 100 grams, and tolerance capabilities of ±0.005" inch per linear inch down to +/-.001" on...

Products : Medical
Makroblend M525 for Wearable Devices

Bayer MaterialScience LLC, Pittsburgh, PA, introduces a new polycarbonate blend developed specifically for wearable devices. Makroblend® M525 polycarbonate/ polyester provides a high level of chemical resistance against body lotions and other chemicals while also meeting the testing requirements of ISO...

Products : Medical
Photo-Etched Stainless Steels

Tech-Etch, Inc., Plymouth, MA, manufactures precision thin metal parts from specialty stainless steel alloys like MP35N used in implanted medical devices, Elgiloy® used in replacement heart valves, as well as 716 and 420 alloys used for surgical blades. Other etched materials include Inconel®, Hastelloy®,...

Products : Medical
Advanced Miniature Push-Pull Locking Connector

ODU-USA, Camarillo, CA, now offers MEDI-SNAP®, a plastic and metal circular connector with miniature push-pull locking connector solutions for reusable and disposable medical applications. Designed for medical emergency response teams and hospitals, light in weight, and with a high chemical...

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