News: Materials
New Antibacterial Material: A Safer Alternative to Silver

The safe use of silver ions in antibacterial textiles has been a matter of debate worldwide, with consumers increasingly seeking a proven alternative. Sweden’s national agency for chemical inspection has ruled silver a health risk, citing possible damage to human genetic material,...

News: Medical
New Type of Electrodes for EEG

A scientist at the University of Eastern Finland has developed a new, easy-to-use electroencephalography (EEG) electrode set to measure electrical activity of the brain. The new design allows the user to attach the electrode set to the patient quickly, without any special treatment of the skin. Its design also...

News: Medical
Exploring Batteries for Micromachinery

A team of researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD, along with other institutions, has developed a toolset to allow them to explore the interior of microscopic, multi-layered batteries. This allows them insight into the batteries’ performance without destroying...

News: Medical
September 2014 Month-End Industry News

Here is the latest batch of news from the medical products community. Please click the link for more.

News: Medical
Improving Hand Function After Surgery

Engineers at Oregon State University, Corvallis, have developed an implantable device using a simple pulley mechanism to improve hand function after surgery. They say that this is one of the first instruments ever created that could improve the transmission of mechanical forces and movement while implanted...

News: Materials
Waterproof Wound-Care Adhesives Inspired by Mussels

Inspired by the natural adhesives secreted by shellfish, which can cling to underwater rock ledges and ship hulls, a team of engineers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, has designed new waterproof materials that could be used to help heal wounds and surgical incisions.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Wireless Pressure Sensor Relays Tumor Pressure

Interstitial pressure inside a tumor is often quite high compared to normal body tissue and may impede the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents as well as decrease the effectiveness of radiation therapy. Medications can temporarily decrease tumor pressure, but identifying the optimal time to initiate...

News: Electronics & Computers
Building Optical Chips that Can Be Tuned to Different Frequencies

Chips that could use light, instead of electricity, to move data would consume much less power—a growing concern as chips’ transistor counts rise. Of the three chief components of optical circuits—light emitters, modulators, and detectors—emitters are the toughest to...

News: Electronics & Computers
Can New Material Succeed Silicon for Electronic Uses?

Silicon is generally the material of choice in the electronics industry. Yet transistors, the switchable valves that control the flow of electrons in a circuit, cannot simply keep shrinking to meet the needs of powerful, compact devices. Physical limitations like energy consumption and heat...

News: Medical
Safety Testing of Wearable Artificial Kidney Commences

A team of scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles, invented a Wearable Artificial Kidney device, designed to untether patients from large dialysis machines. The device can give patients with end-stage renal failure a degree of mobility and freedom for such routine activities...

News: Medical
Snap-Together Modular Microfluidic Systems

By creating easy to snap together components, a team of scientists at the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, Los Angeles, say that it is now possible to build a 3D microfluidic system quickly and cheaply. Microfluidic systems are used to precisely manipulate small volumes...

News: Medical
Comparing Wearable Lifestyle Monitors

While wearable electronic activity monitors may help users reach their fitness and health goals, choosing the right one and remaining motivated enough to wear it may be the bigger hurdle. A team of researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston took on the task of analyzing more than a...

News: Medical
3D Printing Your Own Cell Phone Microscope

Scientists seeking an inexpensive way to turn a cell phone into a high powered, high quality microscope that can be used to identify biological samples in the field, turned to a colleague at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA. Using a 3D printer...

News: Medical
Biospleen Device Can Transform Sepsis Treatment

When a patient has sepsis, in which bacteria or fungi multiply too swiftly in a patient's blood for antibiotics to help, the result is often deadly. However, a new device inspired by the human spleen and developed by a team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Boston,...

News: Electronics & Computers
Connecting the World with Tiny Radios

A Stanford University engineering team has built a radio the size of an ant that requires no batteries. The device gathers all the power it needs from the same electromagnetic waves that carry signals to its receiving antenna. Designed to compute, execute, and relay commands, the tiny wireless chip costs...

News: Materials
Attacking Biofilm Formation

New research by mechanical engineers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, aims at fighting bacterial biofilms that can foul implantable medical devices. Bacteria secrete a slimy substance that forms biofilms, allowing bacterial colonies to thrive on surfaces, including catheters, prosthetic valves, and other...

News: Medical
Improving Pediatric MRIs

To get an accurate MRI, the patient must lie completely still for a long period in a confined space, be able to hold their breath on command, and withstand loud banging noises. That’s why it’s often very difficult to get young children to comply, even though they may need the scans for their healthcare.

News: Medical
September 2014 Mid-Month Industry News

Here is the latest batch of news from the medical products community. Please click the link for more.

News: Electronics & Computers
First Ultra-Flexible Graphene-Based Display Produced

A team of scientists in a collaboration between the Cambridge Graphene Centre at the University of Cambridge, UK, and Plastic Logic Ltd., also in Cambridge, have created a prototype of a flexible display incorporating graphene in its pixels’ electronics, marking the first time that graphene...

News: Medical
Handheld Healthcare Testing in Minutes

Researchers in the George Washington UniversitySchool of Engineering and Applied Science, Washington, DC, have created a smartphone-controlled liquid handling system that could make handheld diagnostic testing a reality. Their technology is operated by a smartphone, using a mobile app that they also...

News: Medical
New Semiconductor Material Beats Graphene

A team of scientists at the University of California, Santa Barbara, have developed an atomically thin, 2D, ultrasensitive semiconductor material for biosensing uses that, they say, could expand the boundaries of biosensing technology in many fields, from healthcare to forensic industries.

News: Medical
Advancing Medical Imaging with Ultra-Thin Detector

Researchers at the University of Maryland, College Park, say that their work could lead to a generation of light detectors that can see below the surface of bodies, as well as other objects. Using graphene, their prototype detector is able to view an extremely broad band of wavelengths,...

News: Medical
Detecting Newborn Jaundice with a Smartphone

Newborn jaundice is a common condition in babies less than a week old. While yellowing of the skin is a primary indicator, that discoloration may be hard to see and, if left untreated, the condition can harm a baby. University of Washington, Seattle, engineers and physicians have developed a...

News: Materials
Germanium Nanowires Could Improve Batteries

A team of scientists at Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, developed a one-step approach to growing germanium nanowires from an aqueous solution. They say that their process may lead to a simpler, less expensive way to use germanium in lithium-ion batteries.

A team of engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using “Shrinky Dinks” material, a polystyrene that shrinks under high heat, to close the gap between nanowires in an array...

Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, were awarded up to $2.5 million to develop an implantable neural device with the ability to record and stimulate...

New stretchable technologies and soft robotics being explored by engineers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, could lead to robots with human-like sensory skin and synthetic muscles, as...

In a combat situation, a wounded soldier can bleed to death quickly without prompt attention. But depending on where the injury is, like a deep wound at the neck, shoulder, or groin,...

Nearly all electronics require oscillators that create precise frequencies, which have, until now, relied upon quartz crystals to provide a frequency reference. However, future high-end electronics...

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Ralph Bright on the Power of Power Cords

Understanding power system components and how to connect them correctly is critical to meeting regulatory requirements and designing successful electrical products for worldwide markets. Interpower’s Ralph Bright defines these requirements and explains how to know which cord to select for your application.

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