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News: Medical
'Kidney on a Chip' Supports Safer Drug Dosing

A "kidney on a chip" device from University of Michigan researchers mimics the flow of medication through human kidneys and measures its effect on kidney cells. The new technique supports more precise dosing of drugs, including some potentially toxic medicines often delivered in intensive care...

News: Medical
May 2016 Mid-Month Industry News

Here is the latest batch of news from the medical products community. Please click the link for more.

News: Medical
Detecting Blood Clots with In-Home Test

Millions of Americans at risk for blood clots, strokes, and hypertension must endure routine lab tests to monitor their blood-thinning medications, which can be frequent, costly, and painful. Now, researchers at the University of Cincinnati say that they are developing materials and technology for a simple...

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Researchers Produce Quantum Dots, Naturally

Three researchers from Lehigh University have found a better, more natural way to produce quantum dots, the valuable semiconductor nanoparticles that support medical imaging applications. The method begins with engineered bacterial cells in a simple, aqueous solution and ends with functional...

News: Medical
Non-Invasive Device Monitors Diabetes

A non-invasive blood glucose monitor from Cardiff University's School of Engineering does not require the extraction of blood. The device, which attaches to the body via sticky adhesives, uses microwaves to measure glucose levels, sending the resulting data to a computer or mobile app.

News: Medical
Glucose to Power Pacemakers

Researchers at the Technological Institute of Energy, Valencia, Spain, are working to create a bio-battery that uses blood glucose to produce energy. Such a battery, they say, would cut down on the number of surgical interventions a pacemaker user must undergo.

News: AR/AI
Peeking in on Surgery

Virtual reality (VR) is back in the news again with the recent releases of the Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive, which both offer a realistic VR experience powered by a gaming computer. By wearing a somewhat bulky headset, users are able to immerse themselves into a world that allows them to interact with virtual objects with...

News: Medical
April 2016 Month-End Industry News

Here is the latest batch of news from the medical products community. Please click the link for more.

News: Materials
Controlling Bacterial Growth on Catheter Surface

A team of researchers from the University of New Mexico, Duke University, and the University of Florida say that they have uncovered a new technique to trap, kill, and release bacteria from a surface, such as bacterial growth on a urinary catheter. They explained that they used cationic polymers...

News: Medical
April 2016 Mid-Month Industry News

Here is the latest batch of news from the medical products community. Please click the link for more.

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April 2016 Mid-Month Industry News (2)

Here is the latest batch of news from the medical products community. Please click the link for more.

By the time you read this, Robert M. Califf, MD, a recognized global leader in cardiology, clinical research, and medical economics, will have been installed as the U.S. Food and Drug...

News: Medical
March 2016 Month-End Industry News

Here is the latest batch of news from the medical products community. Please click the link for more.

News: Medical
Researchers Improve Prosthetic Touch Capabilities

A team at University of California, Santa Barbara created a device that simulates the forces felt by the hand when touching an object. Information from the UCSB study will be used to provide prosthetic hand wearers with more natural touch feedback and a greater range of functionality.

News: Medical
March 2016 Mid-Month Industry News

Here is the latest batch of news from the medical products community. Please click the link for more.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
NASA Adds Flywheel to Heart Pump Motor

When children are born with a missing heart ventricle, doctors can perform a Fontan surgical procedure; the operation creates a passive circulation network to replace the blood pumping function. Inefficiency in circulation, however, often increases over time. A heart pump motor, using NASA Glenn Research...

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Origami-Inspired Devices Support Minimally Invasive Surgery

Brigham Young University (BYU) researchers have engineered new minimally invasive surgery concepts that eliminate the need for pin joints and other parts, instead relying on the deflection inherent in origami to create motion.

News: Medical
Engineers Develop 'Person-on-a-Chip'

Researchers at University of Toronto Engineering have developed a platform for growing realistic human heart and liver tissue outside the body. The AngioChip could help drug companies discover and prevent negative side effects.

News: Medical
2D Semiconducting Material Supports Electronic Implants

University of Utah engineers have discovered a 2D semiconducting material that could lead to much faster electronics. The technology potentially allows medical devices, such as electronic implants, to run longer on a single battery charge.

News: Medical
New Imaging Technique Eliminates Radiation Exposure

A University of Missouri School of Medicine researcher has evaluated technology that may be used to replace fluoroscopy, eliminating the need for X-ray during cardiac ablation procedures.

In December, we asked Medical Design Briefs readers to select one product from our 12 Products of the Month that they thought was the most significant new introduction to the...

News: Medical
February 2016 Month-End Industry News

Here is the latest batch of news from the medical products community. Please click the link for more.

News: Medical
'Sticky' Sensor Mimics Human Skin

A paper-based sensor from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) mimics the sensory functions of human skin. The low-cost "Paper Skin" detects external stimuli, including touch, pressure, temperature, acidity, and humidity.

News: Medical
Open-Source Laser Cutter Prints 3D Objects from Powder

Rice University bioengineering researchers have modified a commercial-grade CO2 laser cutter to create OpenSLS: an open-source, selective laser sintering platform that prints intricate 3D objects from powdered plastics and biomaterials.

News: Medical
Researchers Build Implantable Artificial Kidney

Vanderbilt University researchers have created an implantable artificial kidney that is powered by a patient's own heart. The bio-hybrid device uses living kidney cells and microchip filters to keep a patient off dialysis and remove waste products, salt, and water.

News: Robotics, Automation & Control
Adhesive Polymer Mimics Mussels

Purdue researchers have developed a mussel-mimicking adhesive polymer that is non-toxic to living cells. The synthetic material can be used in surgical and biomedical applications.

News: Medical
February 2016 Mid-Month Industry News

Here is the latest batch of news from the medical products community. Please click the link for more.

News: Medical
Low-Power Chip Supports Navigation for Visually Impaired

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have developed a low-power chip for processing 3D camera data. Using the device, the MIT team built a prototype of a complete navigation system for the visually impaired.

News: Medical
Researchers Question Validity of Wearable Health Devices

The market for smartwatches and fitness bands is growing, but how effective are today's wearable health devices? A study from Lancaster University, the University of the West of England, and Nottingham Trent says that the technologies are marketed under the premise that they will help...

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