Wearables

Smartwatches, Wristbands, & Eyeglasses

Get the latest news and expert advice about today's medical-grade smartwatches, wristbands, and alert apps.

Features: Medical

The population is aging, and more people need health support, which is having a big impact on the overall spend in medical care. Due to this situation, authorities and health insurance...

R&D: Wearables

Engineers have turned tissue paper into a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse, a blink of an eye, and other human movement. The sensor is light, flexible, and inexpensive,...

Features: Wearables

Doctors often tell patients to “listen to your body and take note of what it is telling you.” Now, technology is being developed that will listen for us and process the signals to help...

Briefs: Medical

A wristband-type wearable sweat sensor could transform diagnostics and drug evaluation for cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and other diseases.

Briefs: Wearables

What if there were a wearable fitness device that could monitor your blood pressure continuously, 24 hours a day? Unfortunately, blood pressure measurements currently require the use of a...

Briefs: Wearables

University of Washington (UW) engineers have introduced a new way of communicating that allows devices such as brain implants, contact lenses, and smaller wearable electronics to talk to everyday...

Briefs: Energy

Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created microscale solar cells that could power a multitude of personal devices, including wearable medical sensors, smartwatches, and autofocusing...

R&D: Wearables
Wearable Patch Monitors Biochemical, Electrical Signals

For athletes looking to track their workouts or physicians who want to monitor a patient's heart disease, a flexible Chem-Phys patch from the University of California San Diego analyzes the body's biochemical and electric signals. The Chem-Phys wearable technology records electrocardiogram...

Features: Design

Look around you. Doesn’t it seem like everyone is sporting a Fitbit® or other wearable technology? The fact is, consumers are quickly embracing devices that help them monitor...

Global Innovations: Medical
University of Leeds, UK www.leeds.ac.uk

A postgraduate research student, Devesh Mistry, in the University of Leeds School of Physics and Astronomy, UK, is working with liquid crystal to create a truly...

Features: Medical

Crowdfunding has without a doubt been a positive disruptor across a wide array of industries: from entertainment and retail, to technology, to non-profits. It is a...

Technology Leaders: Wearables

How well do we really know ourselves? Consider that the typical modern automobile provides far more real-time feedback on its operating status than we know about the health of our own...

News: Medical

Google is currently testing a smart contact lens built to measure glucose levels in tears by use of a tiny wireless chip and miniaturized glucose sensor embedded between two layers of soft contact lens...

News: IoMT
Wrist-Mounted Device for the Visually Impaired

The Tacit, a haptic sonar glove that helps a visually impaired person navigate complex environments, has been released as a public prototype. The invention uses ultrasonic sensors to sense objects from about 1 inch to 10 feet away, and translates that information into pressure on the user's...

Applications: Medical

Millions of people with diseases that starve eye tissue and nerves of oxygen may avoid blindness with a procedure developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge...

Ask the Expert

John Chandler on Achieving Quality Motion Control

FAULHABER MICROMO brings together the highest quality motion technologies and value-added services, together with global engineering, sourcing, and manufacturing, to deliver top quality micro motion solutions. With 34 years’ experience, John Chandler injects a key engineering perspective into all new projects and enjoys working closely with OEM customers to bring exciting new technologies to market.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.

Videos