Electronics & Software

Electronics

Explore the advancements in medical electronics and instrumentation, including new embedded systems and power supplies. Read technical briefs that demonstrate successful engineering applications.

News: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Nano-Measurements Using Optical Microscope Technique

New research has confirmed that a technique developed previously at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Gaithersburg, MD, can enable optical microscopes to measure the 3D shape of objects at nanometer-scale resolution—far below the normal resolution limit for optical...

News: Medical
Sweat Powers These Tattoo Biobatteries

A team of researchers at the University of California, San Diego, has designed a sensor applied as a temporary tattoo that can not only monitor a person’s progress during exercise but produce power generated by their perspiration that may be used to energize small electronic devices.

News: Medical
Battery-Free Connection for 'Internet of Things'

In the not too distant "Internet of Things" reality, sensors could be embedded in everyday objects to help monitor and track everything from the safety of bridges to the health of your heart. But what’s holding this new reality back is having a way to inexpensively power and connect these...

News: Electronics & Computers
Designing a Pure Lithium Anode

The race is on to design smaller, cheaper, and more efficient rechargeable batteries to meet power storage needs. Now, a team of researchers at Stanford University report that they have taken a big step toward designing a pure lithium anode, which, they say, would greatly advance current lithium ion batteries.

News: Electronics & Computers
FDA Recognizes Two UL Battery Safety Standards for Medical Devices

UL (Underwriters Laboratories), Northbrook, IL, announced that the FDA has recognized two UL battery safety standards as consensus standards for medical devices incorporating lithium or nickel-based batteries. The two standards are UL 2054 - Standard for Household and Commercial...

News: Photonics/Optics
Lasers May Stabilize Future Electronics

Nearly all electronics require oscillators that create precise frequencies, which have, until now, relied upon quartz crystals to provide a frequency reference, like a tuning fork used to tune a piano. However, future high-end electronics will require references beyond the performance of quartz, say...

News: Materials
Creating Soft Robotics with a Sewing Machine

New stretchable technologies and soft robotics being explored by engineers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, could lead to innovations such as robots with human-like sensory skin and synthetic muscles, as well as wearable electronics. But to do so, they say, you would need a low-cost, highly...

News: Medical
Developing World's First Memory Restoration Device

Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA, were awarded up to $2.5 million to develop an implantable neural device with the ability to record and stimulate neurons within the brain to help restore memory from the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Advanced...

News: Nanotechnology
Shrinking the Gap in Nanowire Technology

A team of engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using Shrinky Dinks material, a polystyrene that shrinks under high heat, to close the gap between nanowires in an array to make them useful for high-performance electronics applications. The group published its technique in the...

News: Medical
Stretchy Yarn Made of Graphene

A collaboration between researchers at Penn State University, and Shinshu University in Japan say that they have developed a simple, scalable method of making graphene oxide (GO) fibers that are strong, stretchable, and can be easily crolled into yarn with strengths approximating that of Kevlar.

News: Medical
Hybrid Circuit Uses Nanotube Transistors

A group of engineers at the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, Los Angeles, say that they are developing a flexible, energy-efficient hybrid circuit combining carbon nanotube thin film transistors with other thin film transistors. This hybrid, they say, could take the place...

News: Medical
Permanent Eye Sensor Could Track and Monitor Glaucoma

A team of engineers at the University of Washington, Seattle, have designed a low-power sensor that could be placed permanently in a person’s eye to track changes in eye pressure. The sensor would be placed during cataract surgery and would detect pressure changes instantaneously, then...

News: Electronics & Computers
Treating PTSD with Removable Brain Implant

Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently received $5.6 million from the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop an implantable neural interface that can record and stimulate neurons within the brain to treat neuropsychiatric...

News: Electronics & Computers
Printing Electronic Circuits and Sensors Directly onto 3D Surfaces

Digital printing technologies play an important role in microelectronics, microsystems engineering, and sensor systems. Recently, scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM in Bremen, Germany, have discovered that they can use...

News: Medical
Students Design Defibrillator Vest

A team of biomedical engineering students at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, designed a lightweight, easy-to-conceal shirt-like garment to deliver life-saving shocks to patients experiencing serious heart problems. The students say their design improves upon a wearable defibrillator system that is...

News: Materials
Implantable Electronic Gripping Devices

A team of scientists from the University of Texas, Dallas, along with colleagues at the University of Tokyo, Japan, have created biologically adaptive transistor devices that have the ability to become soft when implanted inside the body yet can reshape themselves and deploy to grip 3D objects, such as...

News: Medical
Introducing the Bionic Man

The NIH’s Bionic Man site helps viewers visually explore some of the latest bioengineering creations from research funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. From prosthetics to artificial kidneys, these technologies are changing lives now and in the future.

News: Electronics & Computers
Chip Could Eliminate Need for Magnets in Imaging

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD, say that they have built and demonstrated a chip-scale device that both produces and detects a specialized gas used in biomedical analysis and medical imaging. The new microfluidic chip produces polarized...

Applications: Packaging & Sterilization
Cleanliness of PCB Assemblies Leads to Device Reliability

Component manufacturers are continually developing new and smaller packages for components that are mere fractions of a millimeter and have board to component clearances of less than...

News: Medical
‘Smart’ Peg Tests Palsy Patients’ Dexterity

While it may look like a game board and users may find it fun to use, there is a serious intent behind a device created by engineering students at Rice University, Houston, TX, to test the abilities of cerebral palsy patients. The DeXcellence platform uses a small peg comfortable enough for a...

News: Electronics & Computers
New Chemistry Enables Longer-Lived Batteries

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee say they have developed a new type of battery chemistry aimed at producing batteries that last longer than previously thought possible.

Researchers have discovered that creating a graphene-copper-graphene “ s a n d w i c h ” enhances copper’s heat conducting properties, which could help in shrinking electronics....

A team of mechanical and materials engineers in Iowa State University say that they have a new way of looking at electronics—as impermanent materials that can completely dissolve once they are...

News: Medical
Super Thin Material Acts Like a Switch

A team of researchers from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, and Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, have demonstrated how to switch a particular transition metal oxide, a lanthanum nickelate (LaNiO3), from a metal to an insulator by making the material less than a nanometer thick.

News: Electronics & Computers
Pacemaker Powered by Beating Heart

An interdisciplinary research team from Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Arizona, Tucson, has developed a flexible medical implant that harvests energy from the beating heart, which, they say, could be used to power pacemakers,...

News: Medical
Stretchable Antenna for Wearable Health Monitoring

Researchers at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, say that they have developed a new, stretchable antenna that can be incorporated into wearable technologies, such as health monitoring devices.

News: Electronics & Computers
Epidural Stimulation Could Combat Paralysis

Exciting news was reported by an international team of life scientists at the University of Louisville, KY; UCLA, Los Angeles, CA; and the Pavlov Institute of Physiology, Saint Petersburg, Russia; who say that epidural electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has allowed four men who’ve been...

News: Medical
Energy Generator Powered by Saliva

An international team of engineers from Penn state University, University Park, PA, and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia, have discovered that saliva-powered micro-sized microbial fuel cells can produce minute amounts of energy—enough to run on-chip applications, they say. This...

Products: Electronics & Computers
7th Edition Low Level Measurements Handbook

Keithley Instruments, Inc., Cleveland, OH, has published the seventh edition of its no-cost Low Level Measurements Handbook: Precision DC Current, Voltage, and Resistance Measurements. This...

Ask the Expert

Dan Sanchez on How to Improve Extruded Components

Improving extruded components requires careful attention to a number of factors, including dimensional tolerance, material selection, and processing. Trelleborg’s Dan Sanchez provides detailed insights into each of these considerations to help you advance your device innovations while reducing costs and speeding time to market.

Webcasts

On-Demand Webinars: Electronics & Computers

Helping HEV/EV Batteries Go the Distance and Stay Cool Under Pressure

Upcoming Webinars: Test & Measurement

Standardization for Automated-Vehicle Testing and Simulation

Upcoming Webinars: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Rotary Position Sensing for EV Powertrain Applications

Upcoming Webinars: Automotive

Best Practices for Avoiding Systematic Faults and Handling Random...

Upcoming Webinars: Robotics, Automation & Control

How to Identify Good Collaborative Robot Projects

Upcoming Webinars: Transportation

Commercial Vehicle Electrification: Still on Track?

Videos