Electronics & Software

Electronics

Explore the advancements in medical electronics and instrumentation, including new embedded systems and power supplies. Read technical briefs that demonstrate successful engineering applications.

Features : Electronics & Computers
Hospital-Grade Standards for Power Cords and Other Power System Components for Global Markets

While a number of countries have standards in regards to overall medical equipment, a few countries have related component requirements (e.g. plugs and cords). For the countries that do have hospital-grade or medical application standards on components,...

Products : Electronics & Computers
MIDR03M Series 3 WattConverter

PIK Power, Inc., Marlborough, CT, offers a large standard range of MINMAX high isolation converters with models ranging from 1 to 10W. Products with fully regulated or unregulated output voltages are available. The I/O-isolation voltage, depending on model, is rated from 3000 to 4200VACrms reinforced isolation. All...

News : Medical
Recording Speedy Electrons in Silicon

An international team of physicists and chemists based at the University of California at Berkeley has, for the first time, recorded the action of silicon electrons becoming freed from their atomic shells using attosecond pulses of soft X-ray light lasting only a few billionths of a billionth of a...

News : Manufacturing & Prototyping
3D-Printed Contact Lens Combines Plastics and Electronics

An interdisciplinary team of engineers at Princeton University has embedded tiny light-emitting diodes (LEDs) into a standard contact lens, allowing the device to project beams of colored light. While the lens is not designed for actual use, especially since it requires an external power...

News : Medical
Wireless Brain Sensing Untethers Subjects

Scientists at Brown University, Providence, RI, say that a new wireless brain-sensing system will allow them to acquire high-fidelity neural data to advance neuroscience that cannot be accomplished with current sensors that tie subjects to cabled computer connections for analysis. Their results show that...

News : Medical
Developing a Sonar-Assisted Device for the Blind

At Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, a biology professor researching echolocation in bats teamed up with an associate professor of computer science and an interdisciplinary team of students to develop a device that can help the visually impaired navigate better. Their research focused on...

News : Electronics & Computers
Heat-Conducting Plastic Dissipates Ten Times Better

Engineers at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, have developed a plastic blend that, they say, can dissipate heat up to 10 times better than its conventional counterparts. While plastics are inexpensive, lightweight, and flexible, they tend to restrict the flow of heat, so their use has...

News : Electronics & Computers
Printing Electrical Components on Paper

Seeking a way to print technology, improve device portability, and lower the cost of electronics, a team of engineers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, led by Assistant Professor Anming Hu, has discovered a way to print circuits on paper.

News : Electronics & Computers
Harvesting Energy for Medical Implants

Scientists at the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have demonstrated a new technique for harvesting energy from mechanical vibrations of the environment and converting it into electricity. They explain that energy harvesters are needed, for example, in wireless self-powered sensors and medical...

Products : Manufacturing & Prototyping
Product of the Month: MB65S Advanced Medical-Grade Power Supply

SL Power Electronics, Ventura, CA, introduces the MB65S family of 65-watt single-output convection-cooled AC/DC power supplies, designed to meet the new safety standards of IEC 60601-1-2 fourth edition EMC requirements. The new models are specifically designed for next-generation...

News : Electronics & Computers
Coating Batteries for Child Safety

Each year, nearly 4,000 children go to emergency rooms after swallowing button batteries, which can cause burns that damage the esophagus, tears in the digestive tract, and in some cases, even death. To help prevent such injuries, researchers at MIT, Cambridge, MA, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and...

News : Medical
Sound-Powered Medical Implants

Engineers at Stanford University are working on a new generation of medical devices that would be planted deep inside the body to monitor illness, deliver therapies and relieve pain. But in order to do so, they need to develop a way to provide electric power to those implants. Using wires or batteries to deliver...

News : Medical
Exploring Batteries for Micromachinery

A team of researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD, along with other institutions, has developed a toolset to allow them to explore the interior of microscopic, multi-layered batteries. This allows them insight into the batteries’ performance without destroying...

News : Electronics & Computers
Building Optical Chips that Can Be Tuned to Different Frequencies

Chips that could use light, instead of electricity, to move data would consume much less power—a growing concern as chips’ transistor counts rise. Of the three chief components of optical circuits—light emitters, modulators, and detectors—emitters are the toughest to...

News : Electronics & Computers
Can New Material Succeed Silicon for Electronic Uses?

Silicon is generally the material of choice in the electronics industry. Yet transistors, the switchable valves that control the flow of electrons in a circuit, cannot simply keep shrinking to meet the needs of powerful, compact devices. Physical limitations like energy consumption and heat...

News : Electronics & Computers
Connecting the World with Tiny Radios

A Stanford University engineering team has built a radio the size of an ant that requires no batteries. The device gathers all the power it needs from the same electromagnetic waves that carry signals to its receiving antenna. Designed to compute, execute, and relay commands, the tiny wireless chip costs...

News : Imaging
First Ultra-Flexible Graphene-Based Display Produced

A team of scientists in a collaboration between the Cambridge Graphene Centre at the University of Cambridge, UK, and Plastic Logic Ltd., also in Cambridge, have created a prototype of a flexible display incorporating graphene in its pixels’ electronics, marking the first time that graphene...

News : Medical
Germanium Nanowires Could Improve Batteries

A team of scientists at Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, developed a one-step approach to growing germanium nanowires from an aqueous solution. They say that their process may lead to a simpler, less expensive way to use germanium in lithium-ion batteries.

News : Electronics & Computers
Nano-Measurements Using Optical Microscope Technique

New research has confirmed that a technique developed previously at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Gaithersburg, MD, can enable optical microscopes to measure the 3D shape of objects at nanometer-scale resolution—far below the normal resolution limit for optical...

News : Electronics & Computers
Sweat Powers These Tattoo Biobatteries

A team of researchers at the University of California, San Diego, has designed a sensor applied as a temporary tattoo that can not only monitor a person’s progress during exercise but produce power generated by their perspiration that may be used to energize small electronic devices.

News : Medical
Battery-Free Connection for 'Internet of Things'

In the not too distant "Internet of Things" reality, sensors could be embedded in everyday objects to help monitor and track everything from the safety of bridges to the health of your heart. But what’s holding this new reality back is having a way to inexpensively power and connect these...

News : Electronics & Computers
Designing a Pure Lithium Anode

The race is on to design smaller, cheaper, and more efficient rechargeable batteries to meet power storage needs. Now, a team of researchers at Stanford University report that they have taken a big step toward designing a pure lithium anode, which, they say, would greatly advance current lithium ion batteries.

News : Electronics & Computers
FDA Recognizes Two UL Battery Safety Standards for Medical Devices

UL (Underwriters Laboratories), Northbrook, IL, announced that the FDA has recognized two UL battery safety standards as consensus standards for medical devices incorporating lithium or nickel-based batteries. The two standards are UL 2054 - Standard for Household and Commercial...

News : Photonics/Optics
Lasers May Stabilize Future Electronics

Nearly all electronics require oscillators that create precise frequencies, which have, until now, relied upon quartz crystals to provide a frequency reference, like a tuning fork used to tune a piano. However, future high-end electronics will require references beyond the performance of quartz, say...

News : Electronics & Computers
Creating Soft Robotics with a Sewing Machine

New stretchable technologies and soft robotics being explored by engineers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, could lead to innovations such as robots with human-like sensory skin and synthetic muscles, as well as wearable electronics. But to do so, they say, you would need a low-cost, highly...

News : Medical
Developing World's First Memory Restoration Device

Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA, were awarded up to $2.5 million to develop an implantable neural device with the ability to record and stimulate neurons within the brain to help restore memory from the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Advanced...

News : Materials
Shrinking the Gap in Nanowire Technology

A team of engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using Shrinky Dinks material, a polystyrene that shrinks under high heat, to close the gap between nanowires in an array to make them useful for high-performance electronics applications. The group published its technique in the...

News : Nanotechnology
Hybrid Circuit Uses Nanotube Transistors

A group of engineers at the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, Los Angeles, say that they are developing a flexible, energy-efficient hybrid circuit combining carbon nanotube thin film transistors with other thin film transistors. This hybrid, they say, could take the place...

News : Medical
Permanent Eye Sensor Could Track and Monitor Glaucoma

A team of engineers at the University of Washington, Seattle, have designed a low-power sensor that could be placed permanently in a person’s eye to track changes in eye pressure. The sensor would be placed during cataract surgery and would detect pressure changes instantaneously, then...

News : Medical
Treating PTSD with Removable Brain Implant

Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently received $5.6 million from the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop an implantable neural interface that can record and stimulate neurons within the brain to treat neuropsychiatric...

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