Keyword: Heat transfer

Stories

R&D: Energy
A flexible heat harvesting device shows better efficiency at retaining heat to power the device.
Briefs: Wearables
The flexible device harvests heats from the human body.
Features: Medical

The need for thermal management continues to increase in the medical industry. Active thermal management is critical for applications such as patient core temperature management, skin cooling,...

Features: Medical

Infrared surgical lasers, e.g., CTH:YAG @ 2100 nm and TM:YAG @ 2000 nm, are wonderful tools for minimally invasive surgery such as laser vaporization of hyperplastic prostate...

Features: Medical

The structures of most medical devices are far too complex to mold as a single piece. Therefore, it is necessary to assemble their components into a finished product. While...

Features: Software

At St. Jude Medical, ventricle assist devices are developed to improve the lives of patients with heart failure. Numerical simulation is used...

Applications: Medical

Ablation, or the use of high-frequency electromagnetic (EM) energy to destroy soft-tissue tumors, has been in existence for a few decades, but in recent years its underlying technology...

Features: Medical

Electronic devices used in the medical industry have thermal management needs similar to those in other fields. Their electronics must stay cool enough to run continuously and correctly...

Features: Electronics & Computers

Board cleaning is perhaps one of the most overlooked aspects of printed circuit board (PCB) assembly. But savvy medical electronics original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have a keen sense...

Applications: Electronics & Computers

High-frequency pulsed electromagnetic stimulation (EMS) devices are more powerful and effective than ever before. These devices are finding applications in many areas, including as...

Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control

The JenLas® D2.mini 5/8 W, recently introduced to the U.S. market, offers an output power of up to 8 Watts. Lasers of the JenLas D2 product line work in continuous wave mode, emitting green laser...

Briefs: Electronics & Computers

In an increasing number of medical device applications, thermal issues limit the overall performance and reliability of the system. Basic thermal management strategies such as liquid cold...

Briefs: Electronics & Computers
Thermal Management Solutions for Medical Applications

Thermal management of medical electronic devices and systems is now more challenging. Power densities continue to increase while product form factors continue to shrink. Simple thermal management solutions, such as passive cooling (adding a fan and heat sink), are no longer typically viable...

Briefs: Materials
Liquid Cooling/Warming Garment

The NASA liquid cooling/ventilating garment (LCVG) currently in use was developed over 40 years ago. With the commencement of a greater number of extra-vehicular activity (EVA) procedures with the construction of the International Space Station, problems of astronaut comfort, as well as the reduction of the...

Briefs: Medical
Advanced Liquid-Cooling Garment Using Highly Thermally Conductive Sheets

This design of the liquid-cooling garment for NASA spacesuits allows the suit to remove metabolic heat from the human body more effectively, thereby increasing comfort and performance while reducing system mass. The garment is also more flexible, with fewer restrictions on...

Ask the Expert

Ralph Bright on the Power of Power Cords

Understanding power system components and how to connect them correctly is critical to meeting regulatory requirements and designing successful electrical products for worldwide markets. Interpower’s Ralph Bright defines these requirements and explains how to know which cord to select for your application.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.