Keyword: Lithium-ion batteries

Stories

Briefs: Materials

If scientists are ever going to deliver on the promise of implantable artificial organs or clothing that dries itself, they’ll first need to solve the problem...

R&D: Medical

A team of engineers has developed a prototype Li-ion battery that obtains both good flexibility and high-energy density. It allows remarkable flexibility, high energy...

Features: IoMT

Safety and reliability are the key concerns when determining the right power source for a medical device. Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are often considered for their higher...

R&D: Energy

A self-destructing, lithium-ion battery from Iowa State University delivers 2.5 volts and dissolves or dissipates in 30 minutes when dropped in water.

Briefs: Medical
Batteries can last longer after hydrogen treatment.

Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) say that lithium ion batteries can operate longer as well as faster when their...

Applications: IoMT

Technological advancements are making medical devices increasingly feature-rich and miniaturized: two performance characteristics that are inherently...

R&D: Energy

Researchers at Stanford University and the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has invented an electrode designed like a pomegranate with silicon nanoparticles clustered like...

Briefs: Energy

The element lithium possesses fundamental properties that make it ideal for use as the anode in both primary and rechargeable batteries. Vendors have paired the popular lithium anode with a variety...

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Eric Dietsch on the Benefits of Nitinol Wire

In collaboration with the Fort Wayne Metals Engineering team, Eric Dietsch focuses on supporting customers with material recommendations, product development, and education. Eric is available to help you and your company with any Nitinol-related questions or needs that you may have.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.