Keyword: Imaging and visualization

Stories

Features: Imaging

According to a report from Markets and Markets, the diagnostic imaging market is expected to reach nearly $36.43 billion by 2021, at a CAGR of 6.6 percent from 2016 to 2021....

Briefs: Medical

Patients undergoing a positron emission tomography (PET) scan in today’s bulky, donut-shaped machines must lie completely still. Because of this, scientists cannot use the...

R&D: Imaging

Engineers have developed a new technique to control the polarization state of a laser that could lead to a new class of powerful, high-quality lasers for use in medical imaging, chemical sensing...

Briefs: Wearables

A wristband-type wearable sweat sensor could transform diagnostics and drug evaluation for cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and other diseases.

Briefs: Materials

A cartilage-mimicking material created by researchers at Duke University may one day allow surgeons to 3D print replacement knee parts that are custom-shaped to each patient's anatomy.

Briefs: Materials

In regenerative medicine, the ideal repair material would offer properties that seem impossibly contradictory. It must be rigid and robust enough to be manipulated...

Global Innovations: Medical
University of Twente Enschede,
The Netherlands
www.utwente.nl

In collaboration with various companies, scientists at the University of Twente's MIRA biomedical...

Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Scientists have enlisted the exotic properties of graphene, a one-atom-thick layer of carbon, to function like the film of an incredibly sensitive...

Features: Medical

Detection of a single photon is a requirement for many research and medical applications, such as fluorescence imaging, single molecule imaging, and luminescence applications. The...

R&D: Medical

A researcher has devised a way to incorporate new color identifications in ultrasound medical images, making it easier to differentiate fine details that currently appear...

Briefs: Medical

MIT researchers have developed a technique for recovering visual information from light that has scattered because of interactions with the environment — such as passing through human...

Briefs: Medical

Preliminary testing shows that a new device may enable existing breast cancer imagers to provide up to six times better contrast of breast tumors, while maintaining the same or better image quality and...

Briefs: Medical

The fast-growing Internet of Things (IoT) consists of millions of sensing devices in buildings, vehicles, and elsewhere that deliver reams of data online. However, this wide-ranging resource involves so...

Technology Leaders: Medical

For a long time, the ability of robots to interact with humans in our daily lives was more myth than reality— and the idea of robotics performing exceptionally complex tasks such as...

Briefs: Medical

Titanium found its initial use in aircraft because it is strong but light. Today, it’s found everywhere, from eyeglass frames and jewelry to sports gear, tools, surgical and dental implants, and...

Briefs: Medical

In a study led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), epitaxy, or growing crystalline film layers that are templated by a crystalline substrate, is a...

Briefs: Medical

Cracks in ceramic capacitors, devices that store electric charge in electronic circuits, can cause damage to such disparate objects as medical implants and spacecraft. The cracks, which are often hidden...

R&D: Medical
Brain Imaging Sheds Light on Parkinsonian Symptoms

Using a portable device developed at Drexel University, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have identified differences in brain activation patterns associated with postural stability in people with Parkinsonian syndromes and healthy adults. The findings describe the critical...

Briefs: Medical

The discovery of X-rays by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895 changed the medical profession far more than its simple black and white image would suggest. The beams he used, higher in frequency than ultraviolet...

Briefs: Medical

A team of engineers from North Carolina State University and Duke University has developed a metamaterial made of paper and aluminum that, they say, can manipulate acoustic waves to more than...

Briefs: Medical
Additive manufactured tracheal splints provides life-saving support as needed.

Previously, Medical Design Briefs reported on a baby boy whose life was saved using a custom 3D-printed tracheal...

Briefs: Medical
Xbox technology could make X-rays more precise.

A team of scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a new approach to imaging patients, Based on the Microsoft...

Briefs: Medical
Device could change how cancer is tracked.

A team of scientists at the University of California, Davis, was awarded a $15.5 million five-year grant, as part of the part of the National Institutes...

Briefs: Medical
New tool uses light to image tissue in real time.

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Illinois has performed a clinical study comparing a new surgical tool that uses...

Briefs: Medical

Scientists at the Salk Institute of Biological Studies have developed a new technique, they say, to selectively activate brain, heart, muscle, and other cells using ultrasonic waves. Called...

Features: Imaging
Smart X-Ray Source Mark Eaton, CEO; Dr. Ronald Hellmer; Dr. Shuo Cheng; Hugo Leon; and Dr. Leif Fredin
Stellarray, Austin, TX

Since the discovery of X-rays 110 years...

Global Innovations: Medical
Ludwig-Maximilians University and Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics Munich, Germany
www.mpq.mpg.de/en

A team of physicists at Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich and the Max...

Briefs: Medical

The deleterious effects of microgravity are undeniable: reduced bone mineral density, muscle atrophy, vascular remodeling, etc. These health...

Global Innovations: Medical
Kobe University, Kobe, Japan
www.kobe-u.ac.jp/en

A team of scientists at the Kobe University Graduate School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Medicine has...

Ask the Expert

Eric Dietsch on the Benefits of Nitinol Wire

In collaboration with the Fort Wayne Metals Engineering team, Eric Dietsch focuses on supporting customers with material recommendations, product development, and education. Eric is available to help you and your company with any Nitinol-related questions or needs that you may have.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.