Keyword: Quality control

Stories

Features: Regulations/Standards
A robust, optimized mechanical testing program is essential to successful quality control testing.
Features: Design
Unique device identifiers, or UDIs, enable better reporting, reviewing, and analyzing of adverse events.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Automation removes the possibility of human error in high-precision or repetitive processes.
Features: Electronics & Computers
Before you select RF components for an MRI machine, make sure you first understand the basic physics of the technology.
Features: Manufacturing & Prototyping
When the COVID-19 pandemic grounded much of the U.S. aerospace business in 2020, a Massachusetts-based contract manufacturer was forced to improvise.
Features: Materials
Nowak has been in Statistical Process Control for 30 years.
Briefs: Test & Measurement
Inspection, measurement, and documentation are critical elements.
Features: Electronics & Computers
EMS providers, contract manufacturers (CMs), and printed circuit board (PCB) fabricators are the strongest link in the supply chain critical for building medical electronics equipment, including ventilators
Features: Test & Measurement
Regardless of the pace of production, quality control testing is still required to ensure that the products being sent to our front lines will perform as required.
Features: Design
Booth offers advice to other women looking to work in biomedical engineering and science.
Briefs: Software

Medical device companies recognize that having an emphasis on design controls helps to assure good design and engineering practices that yield high-quality solutions. This is critical...

Features: Robotics, Automation & Control

Manufacturers in the medical industry face unique challenges in terms of product mix, throughput requirements, quality standards, and regulatory guidelines. Whether a company is developing...

Features: Manufacturing & Prototyping

In today’s world of medical device manufacturing, cost pressures are very real. At the same time, cost savings can be just as real, especially when companies examine their manufacturing...

Features: Test & Measurement

Vital for ensuring compliance to federal regulations, dimensional metrology systems facilitate critical measurement of medical parts, and force testing systems are used to...

Features: Test & Measurement

Globally, the use of medical consumables continues to rise due to an aging population and the increasing prevalence of day surgeries. As the use of medical...

Features: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Plastics are incredibly versatile. There are thousands of types available to satisfy a myriad of medical applications. Yet, certain plastics present special challenges during the...

Features: Medical

The global market for minor orthopedic replacement implants exceeded $1.5 billion in 2017. Analysts from The Business Research Company forecast the market value to grow at a...

Features: Test & Measurement

The latest advances in 3D technologies are revolutionizing the ability to measure the human body, and this is having a tremendous impact on the healthcare industry and in the development of...

Technology Leaders: Motion Control

CT scanners have far greater accuracy than x-ray technology but place more demands on patients. Getting the high precision, three-dimensional images necessary for accurate diagnosis...

Applications: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Most medical diagnostic and testing equipment involves some type of enclosure, cart, or cabinet that serves as a user workstation or protects...

Features: Medical

Depositing small, repeatable volumes of fluid in assembly applications spans a diverse range of industries. The ability to deposit precise amounts of material is an...

Features: Manufacturing & Prototyping

With the ever-increasing influx of automation in the manufacturing industry, the process of prioritizing accurate measurements is needed now more than ever to ensure that...

Features: Medical

The reliability of the embedded software used in medical devices and the risk associated with it has become a vital concern. IEC 62304, “Medical device...

Features: Medical

Industrial manufacturing of medical products presents distinct challenges. This is particularly true for manufacturing of injectable drug products, which requires minimizing contamination to...

Features: Wearables

In the fast-expanding world of wearable medical devices, an entrepreneurial spirit is driving dreams of a digital health future into reality. Collaboration on material...

Features: Manufacturing & Prototyping

For years, the medical device industry has been leading the adoption of additive manufacturing. With the evolution of high-precision printers that span a large offering of...

Features: Medical

As medical devices become smaller, the need for precision microminiature components increases. This provides several challenges for the medical device manufacturer as they seek cost-effective...

Technology Leaders: IoMT

The medical device market has been rapidly changing over the last decade and a key area of change is addressing today’s fast paced data-driven environment. Multiple sources...

Features: Medical

Many of today’s medical applications use high-quality silica optical fiber. Because a broad range of optical fibers is available to serve this market, users must carefully choose the...

Ask the Expert

Ralph Bright on the Power of Power Cords

Understanding power system components and how to connect them correctly is critical to meeting regulatory requirements and designing successful electrical products for worldwide markets. Interpower’s Ralph Bright defines these requirements and explains how to know which cord to select for your application.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.