Keyword: Bacteria

Stories

R&D: Medical

A new test helps quickly identify people who may be infected with the superbug MRSA when admitted to hospital. Currently, when patients are admitted to hospital they are tested for MRSA — a form...

Briefs: Medical

A study led by scientists from the Regenerative, Modular, and Developmental Engineering Laboratory (REMODEL) and the Science Foundation Ireland Centre for Research in Medical Devices,...

R&D: Medical

Scientists have discovered that laser-induced graphene (LIG) is a highly effective antifouling material and, when electrified, bacteria zapper. LIG is a spongy version of...

Briefs: Medical

Engineers and biologists at MIT have teamed up to design a new “living material” — a tough, stretchy, biocompatible sheet of hydrogel injected with live cells that are genetically...

R&D: Robotics, Automation & Control

Researchers from Wyss Institute have revealed a scalable method for building biomaterials from protein structures known as "amyloids." Ongoing work in the lab will focus on...

R&D: Medical

A team of mechanical engineers at the University of California San Diego has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale. The devices employing the...

R&D: Medical

A portable and power-free test from academics at Loughborough University and the University of Reading rapidly detects bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

Briefs: Medical

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside (UCR) are bringing their idea for a “Window to the Brain” transparent skull implant closer to reality through the findings of two recently published...

R&D: Robotics, Automation & Control

A gel created by Rice University researchers delivers time-released antibiotics to ward off infection while a patient heals from facial reconstruction procedures. Porous...

R&D: Medical

About a million implanted medical devices are infected each year with MRSA and other bacterial species. University of Michigan researchers found that a coating of zinc oxide nanopyramids disrupts...

R&D: Robotics, Automation & Control
Bioengineers Develop Printable Silk Inks

To provide a better tool for therapeutics, regenerative medicine, and biosensing, Tufts University bioengineers have created inkjet-printable silks containing enzymes, antibiotics, antibodies, nanoparticles, and growth factors. The purified silk protein, or fibroin, offers intrinsic strength and...

Briefs: Medical
http://news.nd.edu/news/56829

An applied mathematician and an environmental biotechnologist at the University of Notre Dame have teamed up to develop a new computational model that simulates the...

R&D: Robotics, Automation & Control
Non-Stick Surface Technology Repels Bacteria

Harvard researchers have demonstrated a repellent surface technology that can be used with medical materials to prevent infections caused by biofilms.

R&D: Robotics, Automation & Control
Nanoscale Surface Repels Bacteria

A new type of bacteria-repelling nanoscale surface holds promise for medical applications.

R&D: Medical

A team of engineers at Tufts University, Medford, MA, in collaboration with a team at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, demonstrated a resorbable electronic implant that...

Mission Accomplished: Manufacturing & Prototyping

In the mid-1990s scientists at NASA Kennedy Space Center were experimenting with an unusual substance: cow digestive bacteria. Could it break down leftover dead plant matter in...

R&D: Materials

Any medical device implanted in the body or in contact with flowing blood faces two critical challenges that can threaten the life of the patient the device is meant to help: blood clotting and...

Briefs: Medical

Inspired by a desire to help wounded soldiers, an international, multidisciplinary team of researchers at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine of Senors and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, has...

R&D: Materials

New research by mechanical engineers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, aims at fighting bacterial biofilms that can foul implantable medical devices. Bacteria secrete a slimy substance that forms...

Briefs: Medical

When a patient has sepsis, in which bacteria or fungi multiply too swiftly in a patient’s blood for antibiotics to help, the result is often deadly. However, a new device inspired by the...

Briefs: Medical

Pathogens that cause healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), for example, central line-associated bloodstream infection, catheter-associated urinary tract infection, surgical site...

R&D: Medical

A team of engineers at Oregon State University (OSU), Corvallis, say that they have developed a new technology that could revolutionize treatment and prevention of sepsis. Commonly called “blood...

Briefs: Medical

A team of scientists at the University College London (UCL) have developed a new antibacterial material that could help cut hospital-acquired infections. They used a combination of two dyes with...

Briefs: Medical
High-Density, Homogenous Bacterial Spore Distributions on Test Surfaces

Thus far, spore transfer had been successful from the polycarbonate membrane onto stainless steel, aluminum, and to some extent, glass. In order to image the endospores under an ESEM (environmental scanning electron microscope), the spores were transferred onto a...

R&D: Materials

Researchers from the University of Cambridge, UK, are working to develop portable medical tests and devices, which could be used to monitor conditions such as diabetes, cardiac function, infections,...

Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Cryogenic Grinding for Mechanical Abrasion for Hardy Endospores

A comparative analysis was carried out between an emerging cryogenic grinding method and a conventional wetchemistry/ bead-beating endospore disruption approach. After extensive trial and error, it was determined that a regimen of three cryogenic grinding cycles of 2 minutes each...

R&D: Materials

Researchers at Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, discovered that natural products, like green tea leaves, red wine, dark chocolate, and cacao beans could inspire excellent antibacterial...

Global Innovations: Materials
Ithree Institute, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia
http://www.ithreeinstitute.uts.edu.au/about/index.html

Understanding the enemy, in this case,...

Features: Medical

The recent publication by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of Guidance for Industry Pyrogen and Endotoxins Testing: Questions and Answers, dated June of 2012, the Department of...

Ask the Expert

Ralph Bright on the Power of Power Cords

Understanding power system components and how to connect them correctly is critical to meeting regulatory requirements and designing successful electrical products for worldwide markets. Interpower’s Ralph Bright defines these requirements and explains how to know which cord to select for your application.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.