Keyword: Bacteria

Stories

Briefs: Materials
The coating is customizable to individuals and requires less than 10 minutes to prepare and use.
R&D: Packaging & Sterilization
A team used liquid gallium to test an antiviral and antimicrobial on a range of fabrics, including facemasks.
R&D: Packaging & Sterilization
A coating can be applied to endotracheal tubes and release antimicrobial peptides that target infectious bacteria with specificity.
R&D: Materials
Researchers have engineered new antimicrobial surfaces that can significantly reduce the formation of bacteria on medical instruments, such as urinary catheters, and reduce the risk of patient infection while in hospital.
R&D: Materials
The coatings prevent inflammation or implant rejection.
Briefs: Materials
Medical device OEMs often face a tough decision: Use HCR or LSR for medical device component manufacturing?
Features: Medical
An award-winning pacing system eliminates shocks, leads, and wires.
R&D: Medical
A study has identified new ways in which nano-pillars can damage bacteria.
Briefs: Wearables

According to the World Health Organization, antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health. Sensing and treating bacterial infections earlier could help...

R&D: Medical

Researchers have a developed a double-duty hydrogel that both attacks the bacteria and encourages bone regrowth with a single application containing two active components.

Briefs: Packaging & Sterilization

Ultraviolet light has been used for more than 30 years as a source of disinfectant. A newly introduced product uses the technology to eliminate bacteria on cell phones, tablets and...

Global Innovations: Medical

Cuts, scrapes, blisters, burns, splinters, and punctures — there are a number of ways our skin can be broken. Most treatments for skin wounds involve simply placing a barrier over them (usually an...

Briefs: Medical

A research team led by Tufts University engineers has developed a 3D printed pill that samples bacteria found in the gut — known as the microbiome — as it passes...

Global Innovations: Medical

The insertion of a medical implant in a patient's body carries the risk of bacterial contamination during surgery and subsequent formation of an infectious biofilm...

Briefs: Medical

A visit to the dentist typically involves time-consuming and sometimes unpleasant scraping with mechanical tools to remove plaque from teeth. What if, instead, a dentist could deploy a small...

R&D: Nanotechnology

Scientists have developed tiny elastic robots that can change shape depending on their surroundings. Modeled after bacteria and fully biocompatible, these robots optimize their movements so as to get...

R&D: Medical

Using a small and inexpensive biosensor, researchers have built a diagnostic tool that provides healthcare practitioners almost instant diagnosis of a bacterial infection.

R&D: Medical

A nanoparticle-based technology could be used to improve the speed of diagnosis. This type of sensor could also be used to monitor whether antibiotic therapy has successfully treated the...

R&D: Materials

Researchers have engineered surface coatings that can repel everything, such as bacteria, viruses, and living cells, but can be modified to permit beneficial exceptions. The discovery holds significant...

Global Innovations: Materials
Eindhoven University of Technology
Eindhoven, The Netherlands
www.tue.nl

Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) and Keio University have...

R&D: Medical
Orthopedic Implants May Kill Harmful Bacteria

Researchers are carrying out a range of groundbreaking experiments to test whether mimicking the nanopatterns of the dragonfly wing on orthopedic implants can kill harmful bacteria that cause infections.

R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition

A new type of lab on a chip has the potential to become a clinical tool capable of detecting very small quantities of disease-causing bacteria in just minutes. The device is made of nanosized...

Briefs: Medical

Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are a major, yet often preventable threat to patient safety, and they can have a significant impact on the survival rate of...

Features: Connectivity

A key driver of the medical disposables market is the desire to minimize the risk of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Healthcare providers are turning to disposable...

R&D: Medical

Researchers have built an ingestible sensor equipped with genetically engineered bacteria that can diagnose bleeding in the stomach or other gastrointestinal problems.

Global Innovations: Medical
Chalmers University of Technology
Gothenberg, Sweden
www.chalmers.se

Operations for surgical implants, such as hip and knee replacements or dental implants, have increased in...

Briefs: Materials

Bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers are promising building blocks for the development of sustainable materials with the potential to outperform conventional...

R&D: Medical

Researchers have evaluated a new dental material tethered with an antimicrobial compound that not only kills bacteria but also resists biofilm growth. In addition, unlike some drug-infused...

Briefs: Medical

By using an electrochemical etching process on a common stainless-steel alloy, researchers have created a nanotextured surface that kills bacteria while not harming...

Ask the Expert

John Chandler on Achieving Quality Motion Control

FAULHABER MICROMO brings together the highest quality motion technologies and value-added services, together with global engineering, sourcing, and manufacturing, to deliver top quality micro motion solutions. With 34 years’ experience, John Chandler injects a key engineering perspective into all new projects and enjoys working closely with OEM customers to bring exciting new technologies to market.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.