Keyword: Cardiovascular system

Stories

Briefs: Medical

A revolutionary pacemaker that re-establishes the heart’s naturally irregular beat is set to be trialed in New Zealand heart patients this year, following successful animal trials.

R&D: Medical

As advances in wearable devices push the amount of information they can provide consumers, sensors increasingly must conform to the contours of the body. One approach applies the...

Global Innovations: Materials

Engineers at EPFL and ETH have developed a variable stiffness catheter made of nontoxic threads that can transition between soft and rigid states during surgery. It...

Features: Wearables
The SLG47004 can be used as a cost-effective integrated solution for the analog front-end of an ECG monitor.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
The noninvasive nanochip applies a harmless electric spark to deliver specific genes in a fraction of a second.
Briefs: Medical
The algorithm was able to accurately detect irregular heart rhythms, indicating possible atrial fibrillation.
Briefs: Imaging
AI enables examination of hearts for scar tissue, eliminating the need for contrast injections.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The system promotes myocardial regeneration after a cardiac event.
R&D: Energy
The cardiac pacemaker of the future could be powered by the heart itself.
Features: Imaging
Pulse Technologies has developed a patented technology that uses ultrashort pulse lasers to restructure surfaces in electrode materials and implantables.
R&D: AR/AI
A new tool could speed up the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases.
Global Innovations: Nanotechnology
A nanosensor-based system measures cardiac micropotential energies.
Applications: Robotics, Automation & Control
See how robots are helping to treat cardiac arrhythmias.
R&D: Semiconductors & ICs
A flexible heat harvesting device shows better efficiency at retaining heat to power the device.
Briefs: Nanotechnology
The stent delivers regenerative stem cell-derived therapy to blood-starved tissue.
R&D: Wearables
A smart speaker acts as a contactless monitor for both regular and irregular heartbeats
Briefs: Test & Measurement
Device detects pulse rate and blood oxygen saturation in real time.
R&D: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
A silicone aorta can reduce how hard patients’ hearts have to pump.
Briefs: Medical
The small sensor allows detection of subtle movements.
Briefs: Medical
Fluid could provide a new source of information for routine diagnostic testing.
Features: Electronics & Computers
An industry expert offers tips for overload protection of defibrillators and ultrasound machines used in critical cardiac care.
R&D: Materials
Engineers have developed a new framework that makes elastomer design a modular process, allowing for the mixing and matching of different metals with a single polymer.
R&D: Medical
Researchers have 3D printed a functioning centimeter-scale human heart pump in the lab.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
Sending small electrical currents to the fingertips of someone operating a robotic arm can help surgeons during robot-assisted procedures.
Technology Leaders: Medical
Global Innovations: Medical
The camera-like device can be inserted into blood vessels to provide high-quality 3D images.
R&D: Medical
A new tool using cutting-edge technology is able to distinguish different types of blood clots based on what caused them.
R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A sensor chip smaller than a ladybug records multiple lung and heart signals along with body movements and could enable a future socially distanced health monitor.
Briefs: Medical
3D interface provides cellular-level, full-body blood flow modeling to study and treat cardiovascular disease.

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Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.

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