Keyword: Collaboration and partnering

Stories

Briefs: Materials

A wireless, biodegradable sensor could offer doctors a way to monitor changes in brain chemistry without requiring a second operation to remove the implant, according to an...

Briefs: Photonics/Optics
Detecting nonuniformities in optical properties opens the door to new uses
Global Innovations: Packaging & Sterilization
A team has successfully developed a method for disinfecting PPE so it can be reused or safely recycled.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Designer biosensors ‘switch on’ color or electrical responses to drugs.
R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A new platform provides visual detection analysis for lung cancer and ketosis/diabetes via different testing probes.
R&D: Materials
An international team of researchers has discovered a path that could lead to shape-shifting ceramic materials.
Global Innovations: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A supersensitive magnetometer detects and records brain electrical activity.
R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Researchers have demonstrated the ability to create microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices with channels and valves smaller than ever before.
R&D: Materials
A team used liquid gallium to test an antiviral and antimicrobial on a range of fabrics, including facemasks.
R&D: Nanotechnology
A portable, thumb-sized device can quickly diagnose bad breath by “sniffing” exhalations.
Briefs: Tubing & Extrusion
The device was inspired by nature, specifically insect legs and flagella.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The device uses soft robotics, ultra-thin electronics, and microfluidics.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The use of nanosensors detects cortisol molecules directly.
Global Innovations: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Briefs: Wearables
The strain-sensing sheet detects disorders in real time.
Briefs: Medical
Patches with wireless sensors monitor vitals without interruption.
R&D: Energy

A research team has developed a portable device that produces high-resolution 3D images of human skin within 10 minutes. The team says the portable skin mapping (imaging) device could be used to assess...

Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The materials are suitable for use in soft tissue repair or flexible bioelectronics.
Features: Nanotechnology
"The health system of the future will be consumer-centric, wellness-oriented, care everywhere, and digitally connected,” says one expert.
R&D: Electronics & Computers
The device can be used in flexible, stretchable electronics for wearables as well as soft robotics.
Briefs: Medical
The sensors improve the safety and precision of industrial robotic arms.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The respirator earned a 100 percent success rate for fit testing.
Briefs: Medical
Sensors need to be flexible, stretchable, biodegradable, safe, and stable for use in the body.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Changing the shape of the blade will expand the possibilities of using the laser in medicine.
R&D: Wearables
Flexible TRACE sensor patches can be placed on the skin to measure blood flow in superficial arteries.
Features: Tubing & Extrusion
Smaller parts and devices will likely play bigger roles in the advancement of robotic surgery and telesurgery.
Briefs: Medical
Flea-sized, hollow blocks can be filled with materials that improve healing.
R&D: Medical
Drawn-on-skin electronics allows multifunctional sensors and circuits to be drawn on the skin with an ink pen.
R&D: Medical
Combining silk fabric with epoxy creates laminates that can be formed into shapes for medical uses.

Ask the Expert

Dan Sanchez on How to Improve Extruded Components

Improving extruded components requires careful attention to a number of factors, including dimensional tolerance, material selection, and processing. Trelleborg’s Dan Sanchez provides detailed insights into each of these considerations to help you advance your device innovations while reducing costs and speeding time to market.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.

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Briefs: Packaging & Sterilization

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Technology Leaders: Robotics, Automation & Control

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Technology Leaders: Tubing & Extrusion

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Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control

Robotics Motion Control: The Complex Relationship Between Movement and Task