Keyword: Welding

Stories

Applications: Medical

For years, ultrasonic welding has been used in cleanrooms where plastic components are assembled to complete medical and electronic...

Features: Materials

Plastic consumables for medical applications are often very complex and sophisticated devices. Before these devices can be used by healthcare workers or home care patients, they...

Technology Leaders: Medical
For all of the advancements available in ultrasonic technology, there are certain component, material, or application characteristics that can make assembly quality very difficult to control.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
The facility will be used to perform customer test cutting and complete process development requirements.
Features: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Through a new process, it is now possible to laser-weld two optically clear plastic parts made of a wide range of polymer materials for medical applications.
Briefs: Medical

On its surface, the work is deceptively simple: Shoot a high-power laser beam onto a piece of metal for a fraction of a second and see what happens. But researchers say the physics of laser...

Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Arc welding and additive manufacturing are hugely important for creating large metal components relatively inexpensively and quickly. New research by a...

Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Resistance welding with direct current (DC) using inverter technology reduces costs by improving quality, reducing maintenance, and increasing productivity....

Applications: Medical

Most medical diagnostic and testing equipment involves some type of enclosure, cart, or cabinet that serves as a user workstation or protects...

Technology Leaders: Tubing & Extrusion

Over the past five years, technological advances have enabled product applications for microextrusion to penetrate into the medical OEM arena. Simply speaking, micro now...

Features: Medical

Four lasers can be used for micro welding: pulsed neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG), continuous wave (CW) fiber, quasi continuous wave (QCW)...

Features: Manufacturing & Prototyping

The structures of most medical devices are far too complex to mold as a single piece. Therefore, it is necessary to assemble their components into a finished product. While...

Features: Medical

Ultrasonic welding of thermoplastics has been widely used by the medical industry to assemble plastic parts and components in just seconds without additional...

Briefs: Medical

Flakes of graphene welded together into solid materials may be suitable for bone implants, according to a study led by Rice University scientists. The Rice lab of materials scientist Pulickel...

Features: Sensors/Data Acquisition

The medical industry continues to develop new devices that are smaller in size and more sophisticated in functionality. From in vitro diagnostics and...

Features: Manufacturing & Prototyping

In recent decades, plastics have made healthcare simpler, less difficult, and make new techniques and prostheses possible. Therefore, it is more...

Briefs: Medical

While manufacturers bemoan a lack of skilled potential employees, and returning veterans experience frustration at being able to find employment, one organization— Workshop for...

Briefs: Medical

Northeastern University’s Hanchen Huang, a professor and chair of the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, and two of his PhD students say they have come up with a better way of...

Features: Medical

Finding the right custom extrusion and plastics company to manufacture and provide a key custom component to your end-product needs can often seem a daunting task. With an abundance of...

Briefs: Medical

Over the past fifty years, thin wall small diameter precision metal tubing has undergone quite a transformation. From its use in the mid-1960s as pointers for analog...

Mission Accomplished: Photonics/Optics

In the 1980s, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) scientists James Stephens and Charles Miller were studying the harmful properties of light in space, as well as that of artificial radiation...

Briefs: Photonics/Optics

Adhesives are often used as the joining compound between substrates in the medical device industry. Typical applications for adhesives include tube-to-connector bonding,...

Applications: Imaging

Near-patient in vitro diagnostic (IVD) tests depend on medical devices to perform diagnoses, generally in controlled environments and using non-invasive techniques...

Briefs: Photonics/Optics
Microwave Tissue Soldering for Immediate Wound Closure

A novel approach for the immediate sealing of traumatic wounds is under development. A portable microwave generator and handheld antenna are used to seal wounds, binding the edges of the wound together using a biodegradable protein sealant or “solder.” This method could be used for...

Briefs: Software

Medical device manufacturers are experiencing an ever-increasing emphasis on process accountability. ADAM (Advanced Data Analysis Monitor) is a technology developed for resistance welding...

Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Photochemical Tissue Bonding for Military Medical Applications

Joining severed vessels is a recurring problem in trauma and surgery. The basic technology of joining vessels using sutures has been available for centuries, but remains a slow and tedious process. A complete system for micro-anastomosis of vessels was developed that involves a laser...

Ask the Expert

John Chandler on Achieving Quality Motion Control

FAULHABER MICROMO brings together the highest quality motion technologies and value-added services, together with global engineering, sourcing, and manufacturing, to deliver top quality micro motion solutions. With 34 years’ experience, John Chandler injects a key engineering perspective into all new projects and enjoys working closely with OEM customers to bring exciting new technologies to market.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.