Keyword: Molding

Stories

Features: Materials

The basis of metal injection molding (MIM) technology involves fine metal powders, which are combined with thermoplastic binders and surfactants, allowing injection in a plastic...

Features: Medical

Plastic consumables for medical applications are often very complex and sophisticated devices. Before these devices can be used by healthcare workers or home care patients, they...

Briefs: Tubing & Extrusion
Medical device OEMs often face a tough decision: Use HCR or LSR for medical device component manufacturing?
Briefs: Test & Measurement
Inspection, measurement, and documentation are critical elements.
Features: Materials
Instruments used in minimally invasive surgeries today often require elaborate features, and greater attention to detail in the product-design process.
Features: Medical
Micromolding can be seen as the latest technological innovation that enables the design, manufacture, and clinical use of groundbreaking medical devices.
Briefs: Medical

Silicone has a long and proven history of use with medical devices and can provide many benefits, from flexibility to cushioning. When working with some medical devices, however,...

Applications: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Laser sintering technology enables medical technology designers to print plastic objects for feasibility studies within a very short time. The functional prototypes...

Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Reel-to-reel insert molding can prove a more efficient process for design engineers when it comes to lowering assembly costs. The process is best suited for products that require dimensional stability and need to function in harsh environments.
Features: Design

Device functionality is usually the starting point when designing devices. Another element that needs to be considered when designing devices and their subsequent components...

Features: Medical

As the miniaturization trend continues to take the medical device world by storm, manufacturing with metal injection molding (MIM) and additive processes such...

Briefs: Materials

As Ralph Colby peers at the microscope image in front of him, he thinks he can make them out — “shish kebabs,” as polymer scientists call them. Nobody knows for sure what they are,...

Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Hold speed or hold velocity? How many machines today have it, and what does it do to the process?

Features: Materials

Plastics are incredibly versatile. There are thousands of types available to satisfy a myriad of medical applications. Yet, certain plastics present special challenges during the...

Features: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Modern science has allowed surgeons to fix the human body amazingly fast yet leave behind only small traces where repairs were performed. One of the more commonly used methods to...

Technology Leaders: Medical

Although we’ve heard a lot about the promise of additive manufacturing (AM), the reality is that this technology has not yet caused a revolution in...

Features: Tubing & Extrusion

Device manufacturers count on their supply chain partners for answers. What can be adjusted, how can we add value, and what methods can be used to streamline...

Technology Leaders: Medical

Over the past five years, technological advances have enabled product applications for microextrusion to penetrate into the medical OEM arena. Simply speaking, micro now...

Features: Tubing & Extrusion

Gas assist molding offers a variety of process and design advantages for medical equipment applications. It produces parts that are smooth and extremely cleanable,...

Briefs: Medical

Every day the world’s leading medical device companies rely upon laser direct structuring (LDS) to meet their most demanding design and performance requirements. Millions of electronic...

Features: Medical

Engineering thermoplastics are widely used to manufacture a broad range of medical devices, from single-use syringes and applicators to...

Features: Medical

Electric servo motors are rapidly replacing mechanical, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuation systems in plastic injection molds, particularly those used in medical...

Features: Medical

Successfully using liquid silicone rubber (LSR) and other advanced silicone technologies in medical devices often depends upon access to a deep and broad repository of research...

Features: Medical

The definition of a disposable device can vary. At one end of the spectrum are completely disposable, single-use devices that are designed for use on one patient...

Applications: Medical

Helping blind people gain a sense of vision — and doing so through their tongues — sounds like pure science fiction. It's now a reality, however, thanks to the...

Features: Medical

For years, the medical device industry has been leading the adoption of additive manufacturing. With the evolution of high-precision printers that span a large offering of...

Features: Tubing & Extrusion

They are vitally important, make therapy possible, and they have become an integral part in hospitals or home-care settings: medication and feeding pumps supply patients with essential...

Features: Medical

The 14th annual “Create the Future” Design Contest for engineers, students, and entrepreneurs worldwide, sponsored by COMSOL and Mouser Electronics, attracted more than...

Technology Leaders: IoMT

Visiongain predicts the global medical devices market will reach $398 billion in 2017.1 To win share in this growing market, device companies need to...

Ask the Expert

Dan Sanchez on How to Improve Extruded Components

Improving extruded components requires careful attention to a number of factors, including dimensional tolerance, material selection, and processing. Trelleborg’s Dan Sanchez provides detailed insights into each of these considerations to help you advance your device innovations while reducing costs and speeding time to market.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.

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