Keyword: Adhesives and sealants

Stories

Briefs: Materials
A Band-Aid® adhesive bandage is an effective treatment for stopping external bleeding from skin wounds, but an equally viable option for internal bleeding does not yet exist.
Briefs: Wearables

Trends in wearable technology follow those of the broader biomedical and electronics industries — devices are getting smaller, smarter, and easier to use. Specifically, wearables in...

R&D: Robotics, Automation & Control
A new robotic hand grasps a wide variety of items, including raw eggs.
R&D: Green Design & Manufacturing
Chemists are studying shellfish to develop new, safer, and more sustainable adhesives for a variety of uses, including bandages and other medical applications.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The cellulose nanofiber coating counters bending damage and retains electrode function under water.
Features: Materials
See how advanced adhesive compounds provide manufacturers with an effective alternative to mechanical fasteners.
R&D: Materials
A surgical glue can help join blood vessels and close wounds faster.
Briefs: Materials
The system looks for chemical indicators found in sweat.
R&D: Medical
A double-sided adhesive can be detached from the underlying tissue without causing any damage.
Briefs: Wearables
The new device automatically manages glucose levels and delivers needed insulin quickly.
R&D: Materials
To develop a better adhesive alternative, researchers turned to a polymer: poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA).
R&D: Materials

An alternative adhesive has been developed that adapts to suit a wide range of industrial and medical applications that benefit from sticky materials. The key ingredient is carbon dioxide. About...

R&D: Medical

Researchers hope to make everything from protective clothing to medical implants stronger and more corrosion resistant thanks to a newly developed hyper glue formula. The team of...

Briefs: Materials

Inspired by a sticky substance that spiders use to catch their prey, MIT engineers have designed a double-sided tape that can rapidly seal tissues together.

Briefs: Materials

Chemical engineering researchers at Oregon State University have developed a vegetable-oil-based adhesive that could provide an eco-friendly option in making items such as...

Global Innovations: Materials

Cuts, scrapes, blisters, burns, splinters, and punctures — there are a number of ways our skin can be broken. Most treatments for skin wounds involve simply placing a barrier over them (usually an...

Features: Materials

Whether used in wound care products, ostomy applications, or for adhering wearable devices to skin, advanced pressure-sensitive adhesives are being created to improve breathability,...

Briefs: Materials

Researchers have created a health patch that offers unprecedented comfort and a long battery life, previously unseen in this type of device. The patch can also be manufactured at a...

Features: Design

Selecting an adhesive when designing a wearable medical device is not a trivial exercise. Too often the adhesive selection process is executed with the mindset “tape is...

Features: Materials

Medical device manufacturers often use silicone adhesives to bond parts together when assembling products such as catheters, pacemakers, cochlear implants, aesthetic...

Features: Materials

The performance of adhesives used for wearable medical device applications is critical to the efficacy of the final product, as an improperly affixed device...

R&D: Medical

Engineers have developed a thin, lightweight, rubber-like adhesive film that can stick to highly deformable regions of the body, such as the knee and elbow, and maintain its hold even after 100...

Briefs: Materials

Sutures and staples are the traditional methods for closing surgical incisions and wounds in emergency situations. However, these methods can be inadequate in complex...

R&D: Medical

A newly engineered material could become the first suture-less sealant for wound closure. In laboratory tests of the material, known as a MeTro sealant, the team demonstrated...

Briefs: Materials

To repair ruptured or pierced organs and tissues, surgeons commonly use staples, sutures and wires to bring and hold the wound edges together so that they can heal. However, these...

Features: Medical

Engineering thermoplastics are widely used to manufacture a broad range of medical devices, from single-use syringes and applicators to...

Briefs: Medical

Cellulose nanofibrils have properties that can improve the characteristics of bio-based 3D printing pastes. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is developing a 3D wound care...

Briefs: Materials

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems have developed a soft gripping system that uses differential air pressure and a gecko-inspired...

Features: Medical

Ultrasonic piezo transducers can be used in a wide variety of applications, including medical devices. Because there is no one-size-fits-all solution, transducer...

Ask the Expert

Ralph Bright on the Power of Power Cords

Understanding power system components and how to connect them correctly is critical to meeting regulatory requirements and designing successful electrical products for worldwide markets. Interpower’s Ralph Bright defines these requirements and explains how to know which cord to select for your application.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.