Keyword: Odors

Stories

INSIDER: Sensors/Data Acquisition

A small, thin square of an organic plastic that can detect disease markers in breath could soon be the basis of portable, disposable sensor devices. By riddling the thin plastic films with pores,...

Technology Leaders: Materials

Multipurpose functionality has become an expectation in the modern lifestyle. A washing machine is no longer just a washing machine but rather a computerized appliance that...

Briefs: Medical

A team of engineers at the Texas Analog Center of Excellence (TxACE) at UT Dallas is working to develop an affordable electronic nose that can be used in breath analysis for a wide range of...

Technology Leaders: Medical

PVC and polyurethane are thermoplastic materials that can be formed into a variety of shapes, including tubing and reinforced hose. Both materials are useful in numerous applications. But depending...

Technology Leaders: Medical

Determining what tubing to use in a medical device involves considerable research. Designers must investigate ingredients, performance, documentation requirements, sterility, and other qualifying...

Features: Materials

Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) is well known and specified in the medical industry for advanced medical and healthcare products, due to its high performance characteristics. Because of...

Ask the Expert

Dan Sanchez on How to Improve Extruded Components

Improving extruded components requires careful attention to a number of factors, including dimensional tolerance, material selection, and processing. Trelleborg’s Dan Sanchez provides detailed insights into each of these considerations to help you advance your device innovations while reducing costs and speeding time to market.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.