Keyword: Composite materials

Stories

Briefs: Wearables
A new smart material developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo is activated by both heat and electricity, making it the first ever to respond to two different stimuli.
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Briefs: Medical
Producing biomaterials that match the performance of cartilage and tendons has been an elusive goal for scientists.
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R&D: Medical
The 3D printable nanocomposite polymeric ink uses carbon nanotubes.
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R&D: Energy
An innovative system may provide a new option to use directed energy for biomedical applications.
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Features: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Imagine a world where, instead of a physical warehouse full of actual products, you have an entire digital warehouse of design files.
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Global Innovations: Medical
New biodegradable stents treat radiation esophagitis.
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R&D: Medical
Using 3D printers, scientists have created synthetic soft surfaces with tongue-like textures.
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R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Researchers have 3D printed unique fluid channels at the micron scale that could automate production of diagnostics, sensors, and assays used for a variety of medical tests and other applications.
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Global Innovations: Sensors/Data Acquisition
University of Queensland researchers have developed biosensors that use nanoengineered porous gold that more effectively detect early signs of disease, improving patient outcomes.
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R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Researchers have used 3D printing to make electronic fibers, each 100 times thinner than a human hair, to create non-contact, wearable, portable respiratory sensors.
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Technology Leaders: Medical
Start simple, collaborate early, and seek deep expertise are just three of the important ideas in a post-pandemic medical market.
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R&D: Medical
Combining silk fabric with epoxy creates laminates that can be formed into shapes for medical uses.
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R&D: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Researchers have 3D printed a complex, porous lattice structure using liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs), creating devices that can finally mimic cartilage and other biological tissues.
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R&D: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Researchers have 3D printed a functioning centimeter-scale human heart pump in the lab.
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R&D: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Engineers have created tiny needles that mimic parasites that attach to skin and could replace hypodermic needles.
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R&D: Materials
Researchers are literally carving grooves into plastic threads used to build 3D printed tissue-engineering scaffolds with living cells.
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R&D: Medical
Scientists have discovered a new material that can be 3D printed to create tissue-like vascular structures.
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R&D: Medical
A “bio-ink” for 3D printed materials could serve as scaffolds for growing human tissues.
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Briefs: Medical
Researchers have used sound vibrations to shake metal alloy grains into tighter formation during 3D printing.
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R&D: Materials

Researchers hope to make everything from protective clothing to medical implants stronger and more corrosion resistant thanks to a newly developed hyper glue formula. The team of...

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Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control

A team of polymer chemists and engineers from Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new methodology that can be used to create a class of stretchable polymer...

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R&D: Medical

Researchers have invented a synthetic soft tissue substitute that is well tolerated and encourages the growth of soft tissue and blood vessels. This new material retains its shape without...

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Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems

A Kennesaw State University engineering professor and her team of students have developed a new finger support that could ultimately help those suffering from finger deformities regain motor...

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Briefs: Medical

Researchers from the Faculty of Chemical Technology Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania, are developing an artificial bone, which can be used for treating of the most common joint...

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R&D: Materials

Researchers are developing an artificial bone that can be used for treating of the most common joint disease — osteoarthritis. The bi-functional composite imitates the complex osteochondral...

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R&D: Medical

A 3D printed biopsy robot is propelled by cylinders driven by air pressure. With the help of hoses that supply the air, the control of the robot can be placed outside the MRI scanner. The...

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R&D: Materials

Researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

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R&D: Medical

Researchers have turned to 3D printers, using the machines to build dentures filled with microscopic capsules that periodically release Amphotericin B, an antifungal medication. A study...

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Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers are promising building blocks for the development of sustainable materials with the potential to outperform conventional...

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Ask the Expert

Dan Sanchez on How to Improve Extruded Components
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Improving extruded components requires careful attention to a number of factors, including dimensional tolerance, material selection, and processing. Trelleborg’s Dan Sanchez provides detailed insights into each of these considerations to help you advance your device innovations while reducing costs and speeding time to market.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.