Keyword: Microelectromechanical devices

Stories

R&D: Mechanical & Fluid Systems

Gadolinium-doped cerium oxide could be a promising alternative to certain piezoelectric materials. It is lead-free, which means that it could be employed in biocompatible medical applications. Further...

R&D: Materials

A metasurface lens has been created that uses a piezoelectric thin film to change focal length when a small voltage is applied. Because it is extremely compact and lightweight, the new lens could be useful for...

Briefs: Imaging
New optics-on-a-chip device paves way to capturing fast chemical, material, and biological processes.
Features: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Ultraminiature sensors (<1 mm in size) enable instrumentation of medical devices in order to advance monitoring capabilities, deliver new insight into complex cardiovascular cases,...

Features: Wearables

Momentum is building around connected health applications and the Internet of Medical Things (IoMT), and many believe that, as an emerging sector, it has great potential. It isn't hard to see why...

R&D: Medical

Researchers have demonstrated a new technique for making piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) by connecting a sample of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric thin...

Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition

A new type of pressure sensor is based on micro-optomechanical systems (MOMS) technology. Developed by imec, a research and innovation hub focusing...

Briefs: Connectivity

Sound waves could be used to hack into critical sensors in a broad array of technologies including medical devices, smart-phones, automobiles, and the Internet of Things,...

Technology Leaders: Medical

In the past, the decision to opt for a particular flow sensing technology in respirators and ventilation devices was a painstaking and complex process. More recently, however, flow...

R&D: Medical
Knee Monitor 'Listens' for Cracks, Pops

A knee band from the Georgia Institute of Technology uses microphones and vibration sensors to listen to and measure the sounds inside the joint. The sounds will help doctors determine whether a convalescing joint is healthy or requires more therapy.

Features: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Data drives results. Today, medical devices give feedback and insight like never before. Advances in engineering medical devices has led to smarter devices, improved...

R&D: Electronics & Computers

A team of researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD, along with other institutions, has developed a toolset to allow them to explore the interior of...

Features: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS), as the name implies, are miniature devices composed of mechanical (springs, deformable membranes, vibrating structures) and electrical...

R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition

A team of electrical and mechanical engineers at Israel’s Tel Aviv University (TAU) has developed a way to print biocompatible components for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS),...

R&D: Materials
Silver Circuits Create Conductive Fabric

Researchers at the National Physical Laboratory, Middlesex, UK, Electronics Interconnection group has developed a new method to produce conductive textiles, which could...

Briefs: Medical

A new method developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) offers a precise way to engineer microscopic cuts in a diamond surface, yielding potential...

Mission Accomplished: Medical

CardioMEMS (Atlanta, GA), a graduate of Georgia Tech's ATDC startup accelerator, is pioneering a new class of heart monitoring devices, based on a sensor that measures intracardiac...

Ask the Expert

Dan Sanchez on How to Improve Extruded Components

Improving extruded components requires careful attention to a number of factors, including dimensional tolerance, material selection, and processing. Trelleborg’s Dan Sanchez provides detailed insights into each of these considerations to help you advance your device innovations while reducing costs and speeding time to market.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.

Trending Stories

Applications: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Why Cleanroom Assembly of Plastic Medical and Electronic Devices Requires...

Features: Regulations/Standards

Establishing Proper Validation of Extruded Silicone Tubing