Keyword: Antennas

Stories

Briefs: Wearables

Traditionally, small chip antennas used in Bluetooth-enabled devices have required a designated ground “keep out” area to minimize interference from other components and...

Features: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Traditionally, small chip antennas used in RF-enabled medical devices have required a designated ground “keep out” area to minimize interference from other components and ensure the ideal radiation...

Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Every day the world’s leading medical device companies rely upon laser direct structuring (LDS) to meet their most demanding design and performance requirements. Millions of electronic...

R&D: Medical

Researchers at The Ohio State University have embroidered circuits into fabric with 0.1 mm precision -- an ideal size for integrating sensors and electronic components into clothing. The achievement...

Briefs: Medical

Mechanical Engineering professors Larry Howell and Spencer Magleby at Brigham Young University have spent the past five years applying the principles of origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, to...

R&D: Medical
Treating Tumors with Antennas

Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison are working to commercialize a new technology that could yield less invasive radiation therapies for cancer patients using ablation.

R&D: Medical

A Stanford University engineering team has built a radio the size of an ant that requires no batteries. The device gathers all the power it needs from the same electromagnetic waves that carry signals to...

R&D: Electronics & Computers

Researchers at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, say that they have developed a new, stretchable antenna that can be incorporated into wearable technologies, such as health...

Briefs: Electronics & Computers

A team of mechanical and materials engineers in Iowa State University say that they have a new way of looking at electronics—as impermanent materials that can completely dissolve once they are...

Briefs: Medical

A prototype implantable eye pressure monitor for glaucoma patients is believed to contain the first complete millimeter-scale computing system. The pressure monitor is...

Briefs: Photonics/Optics
Microwave Tissue Soldering for Immediate Wound Closure

A novel approach for the immediate sealing of traumatic wounds is under development. A portable microwave generator and handheld antenna are used to seal wounds, binding the edges of the wound together using a biodegradable protein sealant or “solder.” This method could be used for...

Briefs: Imaging

A safe, non-invasive method for forming images through clothing of large groups of people, in order to search for concealed weapons either made of metal or not, has been developed. A...

Briefs: Medical
Microwave Sterilization and Depyrogenation System

A fully functional, microgravity-compatible microwave sterilization and depyrogenation system (MSDS) prototype was developed that is capable of producing medical-grade water (MGW) without expendable supplies, using NASA potable water that currently is available aboard the International Space...

Ask the Expert

Dan Sanchez on How to Improve Extruded Components

Improving extruded components requires careful attention to a number of factors, including dimensional tolerance, material selection, and processing. Trelleborg’s Dan Sanchez provides detailed insights into each of these considerations to help you advance your device innovations while reducing costs and speeding time to market.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.