Keyword: Electronic equipment

Stories

Features: Packaging & Sterilization
Cleaning is a critical aspect of medical device design that is often overlooked during initial planning.
Briefs: Semiconductors & ICs
R&D: Photonics/Optics
Researchers have proposed a solution to both clearly visualize and accurately assess the brain via photoacoustic imaging.
R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Scientists have created wearable, stitchable, and sensitive sensors from flexible polymers and bundles of carbon fiber.
Briefs: Materials
The wearable, noninvasive glucose monitoring device prototype is the first of its kind.
R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Researchers have demonstrated the ability to create microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices with channels and valves smaller than ever before.
Briefs: Semiconductors & ICs
The new design improves the conversion efficiency and power density of the chip.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The system could improve the quality of life for people with motor dysfunction or paralysis.
Briefs: Wearables
The device could help guide recovery after treatment for head and neck cancer.
Technology Leaders: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Through better detection, digital mammography can significantly improve radiology outcomes.
Features: Materials
The advent of automatic drug-delivery devices has empowered patients to take their treatments in their own hands.
Technology Leaders: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Small medical electronics are at the forefront of a new round of technology trends involving printed circuit board (PCB) assembly and manufacturing.
R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
To make ultraviolet (UV)-detecting wearables, scientists have created a new type of light sensor that is both flexible and highly sensitive.
Features: Wearables
See what's happening at the Designing Biosensors for Medical Wearables Conference.
Briefs: Materials
The device uses soft robotics, ultra-thin electronics, and microfluidics.
R&D: Electronics & Computers
Researchers have demonstrated that they can print layers of electrically conductive ink on polyester fabric.
Briefs: Semiconductors & ICs
The use of nanosensors detects cortisol molecules directly.
Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Automation removes the possibility of human error in high-precision or repetitive processes.
Briefs: Wearables
A flexible, silk-based coil is sewn on the textile.
R&D: Materials
Researchers report the design and fabrication of single-wall carbon nanotube thermoelectric devices on flexible polyimide substrates as a basis for wearable energy converters.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Worn on the fingertips like a thimble, the wearable helps reduce postural sway.
Features: Test & Measurement
Many new companies entering the market are planning a diagnostic roadmap of capabilities beyond their entry point of COVID-19 testing.
R&D: Energy
A flexible heat harvesting device shows better efficiency at retaining heat to power the device.
R&D: Test & Measurement
Scientists have developed algorithms that, combined with wearable sensors, could help clinicians to monitor the progression of Parkinson’s disease.
Briefs: Wearables
The cellulose nanofiber coating counters bending damage and retains electrode function under water.
Briefs: Energy
The wireless patches power themselves with harvested energy.
R&D: Materials
Researchers have developed a soft and nonirritating microfluidic sensor for the real-time measurement of lactate concentration in sweat.
Briefs: Materials
The thermoelectric textile produces a small amount of electricity when heated on one side.
Briefs: Wearables
Patches with wireless sensors monitor vitals without interruption.

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Eric Dietsch on the Benefits of Nitinol Wire

In collaboration with the Fort Wayne Metals Engineering team, Eric Dietsch focuses on supporting customers with material recommendations, product development, and education. Eric is available to help you and your company with any Nitinol-related questions or needs that you may have.