Keyword: Sensors and actuators

Stories

R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A single-use sensor strip can be used with a circuit board.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
The self-powered sensor can be integrated into soft robots or smart clothing.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
The twins enable comparison of the effects of different surgical interventions in a patient-specific manner.
Features: AR/AI
Going into 2022, remote monitoring, wearables, sensors, and other "mHealth" products are taking center stage.
R&D: Nanotechnology
Skin-sensing wearables coat copper nanowires with graphene oxide.
Briefs: Photonics/Optics
New optics-on-a-chip device paves way to capturing fast chemical, material, and biological processes.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Designer biosensors ‘switch on’ color or electrical responses to drugs.
Briefs: Materials
The smart bandage can dispense antibiotic, monitor wound-healing biomarkers, and report important data directly to doctors.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The sensor can be stretched up to 50 percent with almost the same sensing performance.
R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A new platform provides visual detection analysis for lung cancer and ketosis/diabetes via different testing probes.
R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Researchers have developed a genosensor that is efficient in detecting SARS-CoV-2.
Global Innovations: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Quantum sensors for the brain may soon identify brain diseases like dementia, ALS, and Parkinson’s.
R&D: Materials

A prototype of a new biosensor helps detect breast cancer in its earliest stages. The development of this biosensor falls within the field known as liquid biopsy, which helps detect the...

Global Innovations: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A supersensitive magnetometer detects and records brain electrical activity.
R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Scientists have created wearable, stitchable, and sensitive sensors from flexible polymers and bundles of carbon fiber.
Briefs: Materials
The wearable, noninvasive glucose monitoring device prototype is the first of its kind.
Briefs: Wearables
The candy was used as an electrode to detect salt and electrolyte levels in saliva.
R&D: Materials
Researchers developed a method to bond human skin to rubber-like polymeric materials without an adhesive.
R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Researchers used individual fingertips fitted with stretchable tactile sensors with liquid metal.
R&D: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The proposed system will help prevent the onset of diabetes.
Global Innovations: Mechanical & Fluid Systems

The miniaturization of microelectronic sensor technology, microelectronic robots, and intravascular implants is progressing rapidly. However, it also poses major challenges...

R&D: Semiconductors & ICs
To make ultraviolet (UV)-detecting wearables, scientists have created a new type of light sensor that is both flexible and highly sensitive.
Features: IoMT
See what's happening at the Designing Biosensors for Medical Wearables Conference.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The use of nanosensors detects cortisol molecules directly.
Briefs: Wearables
The design could lead to conformable wearable monitors to track skin cancer and other conditions.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A tiny sensor is implanted in the nerve of the injured limb.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
A flexible, silk-based coil is sewn on the textile.
Global Innovations: Nanotechnology
A nanosensor-based system measures cardiac micropotential energies.
R&D: Photonics/Optics
A prototype of a fluorescence-based sensor provides continuous detection of cortisol concentrations in real time.

Ask the Expert

Ralph Bright on the Power of Power Cords

Understanding power system components and how to connect them correctly is critical to meeting regulatory requirements and designing successful electrical products for worldwide markets. Interpower’s Ralph Bright defines these requirements and explains how to know which cord to select for your application.

Inside Story

Rapid Precision Prototyping Program Speeds Medtech Product Development

Rapid prototyping technologies play an important role in supporting new product development (NPD) by companies that are working to bring novel and innovative products to market. But in advanced industries where products often make use of multiple technologies, and where meeting a part’s exacting tolerances is essential, speed without precision is rarely enough. In such advanced manufacturing—including the medical device and surgical robotics industries — the ability to produce high-precision prototypes early in the development cycle can be critical for meeting design expectations and bringing finished products to market efficiently.