The bioprinter enables surgeons to deposit scaffolds directly into the defect sites within weakened skeletal muscles. (Credit: UConn)

Researchers have developed a handheld 3D bioprinter that could revolutionize the way musculoskeletal surgical procedures are performed. The bioprinter enables surgeons to deposit scaffolds — or materials to help support cellular and tissue growth — directly into the defect sites within weakened skeletal muscles.

The scaffolds from the bioprinter adhere precisely to the surrounding tissues of the injury and mimic the properties of the existing tissue — eliminating the need for any suturing.

In contrast to existing 3D bioprinting technology, this bioprinter prints gelatin-based hydrogels — known as bioink— that have been proven to be effective in adhering to defect sites of mice with volumetric muscle loss injury. The mice showed a significant increase in muscle hypertrophy following Tamayol’s therapy.

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Medical Design Briefs Magazine

This article first appeared in the May, 2020 issue of Medical Design Briefs Magazine.

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