Guide to FDA Requirements and Importance of Medical Device Calibration
Engineers Design Color- Changing Compression Bandage
Improved 3D Printing for Patient-Specific Medical Diagnosis
Data, Data Everywhere: Why the Medical Device Industry Must Embrace the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Implantable Islet Cells Come with Their Own Oxygen Supply
Evaluating Electronics Contract Manufacturers for Medical Devices
Two-Component Molding Can Solve Medical Design Challenges and Reduce Costs
Therapeutic Gel Shows Promise Against Cancerous Tumors
Scientists Develop Elastic Metal Rods to Treat Scoliosis
Key Factors for Choosing Silicone Solutions in Medical Device Lubrication
News
This prototype is the first all-optical ultrasound imager to demonstrate video-rate, real-time 2D imaging of biological tissue. (Credit: Erwin J. Alles, University College London)

A new ultrasound system that uses optical, instead of electronic components, could improve performance while giving doctors significantly more flexibility in how they use ultrasound to diagnose and treat medical problems.

Researchers demonstrated for the first time the use of an all-optical ultrasound imager for video-rate, real-time 2D imaging of biological tissue. The achievement is an important step toward making all-optical ultrasound practical for routine clinical use. Because they require no electronic components in the imaging probe, all-optical ultrasound systems could be safely used at the same time as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners. This would give doctors a more comprehensive picture of the tissues around an area of interest, such as a tumor or blood vessel.

Lightbeam scanning mirrors built into the device increase image quality and make it possible to acquire images in different modes. In a clinical setting, this would allow doctors to rapidly toggle between modes on a single instrument to suit the task at hand. Acquiring different types of images using conventional ultrasound systems typically requires separate specialized probes. To adapt the technology for clinical use, the researchers are working to develop a long, flexible imaging probe for free-hand operation, as well as miniaturized versions for endoscopic applications.

Source