Scientists have developed a technology to study the behavior of orthopedic implants in laboratory conditions as close as possible to the human body. The technology is notable for its ethics: the research can be carried out in vitro — that is, without involving lab animals.

The technology allows researchers to predict the wear of prosthetic materials. (Credit: NUST MISIS).

The technology allows them to predict the wear of prosthetic materials under mechanical stress in an environment comparable to the real ones the materials are used in. Specially synthesized liquid simulating human blood plasma and a high-tech servo-hydraulic installation have thus completely replaced the need for an experimental live sample.

The economy of time is another significant advantage of the proposed technology. If the assessment of an implant's chemical aging in a living organism takes about a year, the durability tests require decades. The process of chemical aging and wear can be significantly accelerated in conditions of in vitro. If the wear indicators are unsatisfactory, this will be immediately apparent and it will be possible to continue experiments with other samples.

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